Adriana Trigiani

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Adriana Trigiani
Born Big Stone Gap, Virginia
Occupation Novelist, television writer, producer, film director

Adriana Trigiani is an American novelist, television writer, producer and film director.

Career[edit]

Trigiani grew up in Big Stone Gap, Virginia[1] and attended Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana.[2] She was a writer for The Cosby Show and its spin-off series A Different World before beginning on novels.[2] In 1996, she won the "Most Popular Documentary" award at the Hamptons International Film Festival for directing the Queens of the Big Time. The following year, she served as co-producer on the documentary film Green Chimneys.

In 2001, Trigiani wrote a novel about the town titled Big Stone Gap, based on a screenplay by the same name she authored.[1][2] It was followed by three sequels, Big Cherry Holler,[1] Milk Glass Moon, and Home to Big Stone Gap.[3] Aside from that series, she has written Rococo,[4] Queen of the Big Time,[4] and Lucia, Lucia, which became a best-seller in Britain.[5] Very Valentine, was published in February 2009, and followed by Brava Valentine Valentine in 2010.[6][7]

She also co-authored "Cooking With My Sisters: One Hundred Years of Family Recipes" with Mary Trigiani, her sister. The family memoir-meets-cookbook includes the contributions of their three sisters and their mother. [1]

In 2008 Trigiani served as the Appalachian writer in residence at Shepherd University.[1]

Trigiani lives in Greenwich Village in New York.[5]

Filmography[edit]

Film
Year Film Notes
1996 Queens of the Big Time Director
1997 Green Chimneys Co-producer
Television
Year Title Notes
1989–1990 A Different World Writer, 3 episodes
1991–1992 The Cosby Show Writer, 5 episodes

Literary works[edit]

Novels[edit]

Cookbooks[edit]

Awards[edit]

Year Award Result Category Film
1996 Hamptons International Film Festival Won Most Popular Documentary Queens of the Big Time

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Mason, Cecelia (2008-10-03). "Writer’s career rooted in Appalachia". West Virginia Public Broadcasting. 
  2. ^ a b c Laube, Leigh (2006-10-22). "Trigiani writing Big Stone Gap screenplay". TimesNews.net. 
  3. ^ "Best-selling author returns home in latest novel". Retrieved 2010-11-26. 
  4. ^ a b Spice, Martin (2006-01-01). "Over the top but endearing". The Start. 
  5. ^ a b Williams, Andrew. "60 Seconds: Adriana Trigiani". Metro. 
  6. ^ Memmott, Carol (2009-02-11). "5 questions for Adriana Trigiani". USA TODAY. 
  7. ^ Trigiani, Adriana (2010-06-05). "Review: Encore Valentine". Independent.ie. 
  8. ^ "Author Adriana Trigiani forays into teen fiction". Retrieved 2010-11-26. 

External links[edit]