Allyl methyl sulfide

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Allyl methyl sulfide
XYZ
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
3-Methylsulfanylprop-1-ene
Other names
Methyl propenyl sulfide
3-Methylthio-1-propene
Identifiers
10152-76-8 N
ChemSpider 21159856 YesY
EC number 233-422-0
Jmol-3D images Image
MeSH allyl+methyl+sulfide
PubChem 66282
RTECS number UD1015000
UN number 1993
Properties
C4H8S
Molar mass 88.17 g·mol−1
Odor Garlic
Density 0.803 g cm−3
Boiling point 92 °C; 197 °F; 365 K
Hazards
GHS pictograms The flame pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word DANGER
H225
P210
EU classification Highly Flammable F
R-phrases R11
S-phrases S16, S29, S33
Flash point 18.0 °C (64.4 °F; 291.1 K)
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Allyl methyl sulfide (AMS) is an organosulfur compound with the chemical formula CH2=CHCH2SCH3. The molecule features two functional groups, an allyl (CH2=CHCH2) and a sulfide. It is a colourless liquid with a strong odor characteristic of alkyl sulfides. It is a metabolite of garlic, and "garlic breath" is attributed to its presence.[1]

It is prepared by the reaction of allyl chloride with sodium hydroxide and methanethiol.

CH2=CHCH2Cl + NaOH(aq) + CH3SH → CH2=CHCH2SCH3 + NaCl + H2O

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eric Block (2010-01-04). Garlic and Other Alliums: The Lore and the Science. Royal Society of Chemistry. ISBN 978-0-85404-190-9.