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Allyson Robinson

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Allyson Robinson
Allysonr-head3.jpg
Born Scranton, Pennsylvania, US[1]
Known for LGBT rights activism

Allyson Robinson is an American human rights activist, specializing in LGBT rights in the United States. She attended West Point before gender reassignment, graduated in 1994 majoring in her undergraduate degree in physics, and was then commissioned as an officer serving in the U.S. Army until 1999. She held the rank of Captain.[2] Also prior to transition, she became an ordained Baptist minister, earning from the Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary, a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) with an emphasis on social justice.

In 2008 she joined the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), oversaw HRC's program to create model curricula for LGBT diversity training in the workplace and advanced to the executive director in 2012.[1]

Later that year she began a short controversial tenure as the first executive director of OutServe-SLDN, a network of LGBT actively serving military personnel, following the merger of OutServe and Servicemembers Legal Defense Network in October 2012.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11] She was the first transgender person to lead a national LGBT rights organization that did not have an explicit transgender focus.[3][4][12]

Career[edit]

Prior to transitioning, Robinson majored in physics at West Point and graduated in 1994.[13][14][15][16] She later held an internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory and then commanded a Patriot missile unit in Europe and the Middle East before leaving the U.S. Army in 1999.[1][16][17][18] Following this, she became an ordained Baptist minister, earning a master of divinity degree in theology with an emphasis on social justice from Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary in 2007.[19] After transitioning to present as female in 2007, in 2008 she visited West Point and addressed some cadets.[16]

In 2008 she joined the HRC Foundation, where as their first Deputy Director for Employee Programs she oversaw HRC's program to create model curricula for LGBT diversity training in the workplace. She remained there before assuming her role as executive director in 2012.[1]

She has been a member of the board of directors of several advocacy groups, including the International Foundation for Gender Education, the Association of Welcoming and Affirming Baptists, and Knights Out.[20]

In October 2012 she became the first executive director of OutServe-SLDN, a network of LGBT actively serving military personnel, following the merger of OutServe and Servicemembers Legal Defense Network.[9][10][11] She was the first transgender person to ever lead a national LGBT rights organization that does not have an explicit transgender focus.[12]

The group was in the process of losing much of its funding base after the official September 2011 repeal of Don't ask, don't tell (DADT), the official United States policy on banning and expelling gays serving in the military enacted in 1993.[3][4][21][22][23] Robinson was tasked with bridging the two former groups, and reworking a shrinking budget, having to lay off half the new groups' staff. Nine months after hiring her, OutServe-SLDN's board announced it was bankrupt and had to close its Washington D.C. headquarters; on the same day, Robinson announced that her resignation as executive director would take effect the following day, July 12, 2013.[7][8]

In 2014, Calvary Baptist Church in Washington ordained her to the gospel ministry.[24]

Personal life[edit]

Robinson has been married to Danyelle Robinson since 1994. They have four children.[1][18][25]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "The HRC Story, "Allyson Robinson"". Human Rights Campaign. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  2. ^ http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/11/hagel-military-transgender-rule-review
  3. ^ a b c Brydum, Sunnivie (2013-07-30). "What Really Happened When OutServe-SLDN Came Undone". Advocate.com. Retrieved 2014-06-29. 
  4. ^ a b c "OutServe-SLDN co-chair steps down". Americablog.com. Retrieved 2014-06-29. 
  5. ^ Brydum, Sunnivie (2013-07-22). "Transgender Group Leaves OutServe-SLDN, Joins Startup Group SPART*A". Advocate.com. Retrieved 2014-06-29. 
  6. ^ OutServe-SLDN to Restructure, Josh Seefried to Resign | Advocate.com
  7. ^ a b Aravosis, John (July 11, 2013). "Allyson Robinson announces resignation as ED of OutServe-SLDN". Americablog. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Aravosis, John (July 12, 2013). "OutServe-SLDN closes headquarters, reveals organization is bankrupt". Americablog. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Londoño, Ernesto (February 5, 2013). "Pentagon to extend certain benefits to same-sex spouses". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 7, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b Geidner, Chris (December 11, 2012). "OutServe-SLDN's Allyson Robinson First Recipient of Arcus Grants Supporting New Leadership". Metro Weekly. Retrieved February 7, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "SLDN & Outserve Tap Army Veteran To Lead Newly Combined Organization". Servicemembers Legal Defense Network. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  12. ^ a b "Military Group Picks Trans Woman As Leader". Buzzfeed. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  13. ^ Leff, Lisa (January 30, 2011). "Transgender veterans seek recognition". Boston Globe. Retrieved May 24, 2013. 
  14. ^ Shane III, Leo (October 24, 2012). "New head of gay rights advocacy group sees more work to be done". Stars and Stripes. Retrieved May 24, 2013. 
  15. ^ Lopez Torregrosa, Luisita (April 30, 2013). "The Face of the Gay Rights Movement". New York Times. Retrieved May 24, 2013. 
  16. ^ a b c Maze, Rick (October 25, 2012). "Transgender Army vet to lead gay rights group". Army Times. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Gay colonel recalls ‘don't ask' investigation". Military Times. March 15, 2013. Retrieved May 24, 2013. 
  18. ^ a b Stone, Andrea (October 25, 2012). "Allyson Robinson, Transgender Veteran, Named To Helm Advocacy Group For LGBTs In Military". Huffington Post. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  19. ^ "About Allyson and this blog". Crossing the T. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  20. ^ "2011 Presenter Bios & Course Descriptions". Keystone Conference. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  21. ^ 10 U.S.C. § 654(b)
  22. ^ 10 U.S.C. § 654(e)
  23. ^ "Obama certifies end of military's gay ban". NBC News. Reuters. July 22, 2011. Retrieved July 22, 2011. 
  24. ^ http://www.abpnews.com/culture/social-issues/item/28922-baptist-church-ordains-transgender-woman
  25. ^ Gonzalez, Analiz (November 18, 2005). "Bill may aid parents in juggling dual roles". Baylor Lariat. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 

External links[edit]