Baby Now That I've Found You

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"Baby, Now That I've Found You"
Single by The Foundations
from the album Baby, Now That I've Found You
B-side "Come On Back to Me"
Released 1967
Format 7"
Genre Pop
Length 3:04
Label Pye,[1] UK Uni, US
Writer(s) Tony Macaulay, John MacLeod[1]
Producer(s) Tony Macaulay[1]
The Foundations singles chronology
Baby, Now That I've Found You
(1967)
Back on My Feet Again
(1968)

"Baby, Now That I've Found You" is a song written by Tony Macaulay and John MacLeod.[1] Part of the song was written in the same bar of a Soho tavern where Karl Marx is supposed to have written Das Kapital.[2] The lyrics are a plea that an unnamed subject not break up with the singer.

Original recording and The Foundations[edit]

In 1967, The Foundations released it as their début single. When "Baby Now That I've Found You" was first released it went nowhere. BBC's newly founded Radio 1 were looking to avoid any records being played by the pirate radio stations and they looked back at some recent releases that the pirate stations had missed.[citation needed] "Baby, Now That I've Found You" was one of them. The single then took off and by November it was number one in the British charts. It met with great success, becoming a number 11 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and topping the UK Singles Chart for two weeks in November 1967.[3] The song also reached number 1 on the Canadian RPM magazine charts 10 February 1968.

Another version of the song was recorded by The Foundations in 1968 that featured Colin Young, Clem Curtis' replacement. This was on a Marble Arch album that featured newer stereo versions of their previous hits.[2]

Original lead singer of the Foundations, Clem Curtis recorded his own version of it and it was released on the Opium label OPIN 001 as a 7" single and a 12" version OPINT001 in 1987.[4]

In the late 1980s, Clem Curtis and Alan Warner teamed up to recut "Baby, Now That I've Found You" and "Build Me Up Buttercup" as well as other hits of The Foundations.[2]

Other versions[edit]

The song has been covered by a number of other artists. One of the earlier versions was a rocksteady version was recorded by Alton Ellis for his 1967 album Sings Rock and Soul.[5] Lana Cantrell recorded it for her 1968 Lana album.[6] The same year The Marble Arch Orchestra recorded an instrumental version of the song for their album Tomorrow's Standards.[7] In 1978 Donny and Marie Osmond recorded it for the soundtrack album for their film Goin’ Coconuts.[8] The song was also recorded by Dan Schafer, in 1977 on Tortoise International Records,[9][10] an RCA Records subsidiary.

Dan Schafer 1977 Tortoise International/RCA 45 single

In March 2012, this version was included on the compilation album, Perhaps..the Very Best of Dan Schafer.[11]

The song was a 1995 country hit for Alison Krauss from the album Now That I've Found You: A Collection. Her version appeared in the Australian comedy film, The Castle.[12] It peaked at number 49 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart.[13]

In the Philippines the song was recorded by MYMP for their album MYMP Live at the Music Museum. South American artist Daniel Boaventura has also recorded a version which appears on his Songs 4 U album.[14]

Use in film[edit]

The Foundations' recording of the song appeared on the soundtrack to the film Shallow Hal.

Singles released[edit]

  • The Foundations - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Come On Back to Me" - PYE 7N 17366 - (UK) - 1967
  • The Foundations - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Build Me Up Buttercup" - Flashbacks FBS6 - (UK)
  • The Foundations - "Build Me Up Buttercup" / "Baby, Now That I've Found You" - Eric 192
  • Big Ben (Ben Atkins) - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Would I Better Gone ?" - Enterprise ENA-9061 - 1972 [15]
  • Vicki Sue Robinson - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Thanks A Million" - RCA 10282 - 1975[16]
  • Dan Schafer - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" - RCA/Tortoise International, Inc VB 11292 - 1977 [9][10]
  • Clem Curtis & The Foundations - Baby Now That I've Found You (Extended Version) / Baby Now That I've Found You (7" Version), Baby Now That I've Found You (Busk Mix) - Opium Records OPINT 001 - 1987 [4]
  • Any Trouble - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Bricks & Mortar" - EMI America EA 166 - (US) - 1984
  • Alison Krauss & Union Station - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Oh, Atlanta" / "Every Time You Say Goodbye" - CRCDS 4 - (Holland) - 1995 (CD single)
  • Lauren Waterworth - "Baby, Now That I've Found You" / "Baby, Now That I've Found You"

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Rice, Jo (1982). The Guinness Book of 500 Number One Hits (1st ed.). Enfield, Middlesex: Guinness Superlatives Ltd. p. 112. ISBN 0-85112-250-7. 
  2. ^ a b c Dopson, Roger. Baby Now That I've Found You, Sequel Records NEECD 300 (1st ed.). UK: Sequel REcords. 
  3. ^ "Official Singles Chart UK Top 100 - 22nd February 2014 | The UK Charts | Top 40". Theofficialcharts.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  4. ^ a b "Clem Curtis & The Foundations - Baby Now That I've Found You (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  5. ^ [1][dead link]
  6. ^ [2][dead link]
  7. ^ "A Whiter Shade of Pale - Versions - Martin's Collection - M". Awsop-versions.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  8. ^ "Discography". Osmondmania.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  9. ^ a b "Dan Schafer (2) - Baby, Now That I've Found You (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs.com. 2011-12-23. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  10. ^ a b "Record label". Timashley.tripod.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  11. ^ "’Perhaps..the Very Best of’". Cdbaby.com. Retrieved 2012-03-05. 
  12. ^ "The Castle (1997) : Soundtracks". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  13. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2013). Hot Country Songs 1944–2012. Record Research, Inc. p. 184. ISBN 978-0-89820-203-8. 
  14. ^ "sanjose72.com". sanjose72.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  15. ^ "Big Ben Atkins Single Discography". Geocities.jp. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 
  16. ^ "Vicki Sue Robinson : Baby, Now That I've Found You b/w Thanks a Million (7")". DiscoMusic.com. Retrieved 2014-02-17. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Massachusetts" by The Bee Gees
UK number one single
8 November 1967 (two weeks)
Succeeded by
"Let the Heartaches Begin" by Long John Baldry