Barbara Ann Crancer

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Barbara Ann Crancer
Associate Circuit Judge of the 21st Missouri Circuit Court
In office
July 1992 – March 2008
Assistant Missouri Attorney General of Civil, Disability and Workers' Rights Division
In office
February 2009 – March 2011
Appointed by Chris Koster
Personal details
Born Barbara Ann Hoffa
1938
Detroit, Michigan
Relations Jimmy Hoffa (father)
James P. Hoffa (brother)
Alma mater Albion College Undergraduate
Washington University School of Law Juris Doctor

Barbara Ann Crancer (née Hoffa, born 1938) is a former St. Louis County (Missouri) Associate Circuit Court Judge. She is the daughter of former Teamsters Union president Jimmy Hoffa and Josephine (Poszywak) Hoffa.

Crancer was born in Detroit, Michigan. She earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Albion College (Michigan) in 1960, and a Juris Doctor Degree from Washington University School of Law (Missouri). Crancer served as a private practice lawyer in St. Louis through 1989 when she was appointed Legal Advisor and then Administrative Law Judge for Missouri Division of Workers' Compensation, serving until 1992. In July 1992, Crancer was appointed to Associate Circuit Judge for St. Louis County, Missouri. Judge Crancer retired as an Associate Circuit Judge in March 2008, but in March 2009, Judge Crancer agreed to serve as an Assistant Attorney General to the Attorney General for the State of Missouri, Chris Koster, as Chief Counsel of the Division of Civil Disability and Workers Rights.[1]

Her younger brother is James P. Hoffa, current president of the Teamsters Union. While the siblings grew up in Detroit, the Hoffa family also spent time at their summer cottage in Orion Township, Michigan.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Koster names Judge Barbara Crancer to head new division on worker, disability and civil rights, Attorney General's News Release, Missouri Attorney General's Office, February 23, 2009.
  2. ^ How one man's bad luck paved way for creation of Cranbrook The Detroit News, January 14, 2002.