Bela G. Lugosi

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Bela George Lugosi also known as Bela Lugosi, Jr. (born January 5, 1938 in Los Angeles, California) is the son of Béla Lugosi. A California attorney, his legal actions in Lugosi v. Universal Pictures, led to the creation of the California Celebrities Rights Act.

Biography[edit]

He was born on January 5, 1938 in Los Angeles, California.

He was an executive at Comedy III Productions, which owned the licensing rights to The Three Stooges.[1][2]

Legacy[edit]

Bela Lugosi, Jr. has been among those who felt notorious filmmaker Edward D. Wood, Jr. exploited his father's stardom, taking advantage of the fading actor when he could not refuse any work.[3] Most documents and interviews with other Wood associates in Nightmare of Ecstasy suggest that Wood and Lugosi were genuine friends and that Wood helped Lugosi through the worst days of his depression and drug addiction.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Friedemann O’Brien Goldberg & Zarian Names Bela G. Lugosi Of Counsel". Metropolitan News-Enterprise. Retrieved 2008-04-20. But an appeals court overturned that decision and finally in 1979, the California Supreme Court, in Lugosi v. Universal Pictures, ruled that Lugosi did not inherit any rights that Universal Pictures infringed. It said the Lugosi name and likeness could not pass on to the actor’s heirs, since the right of publicity died with Lugosi. However, the California Assembly passed a “Celebrities Rights Act” in 1985 which said that rights of publicity survive the celebrity’s death and descend to heirs by wills, among other means. 
  2. ^ Harper, Jennifer (1999-08-23). "A Rose Is Still a Rose ... Unless It's Been Licensed - growth in marketing if licensed products - includes article on poll about greatest US achievement in 20th century". Bnet. Retrieved 2008-04-20. Lugosi and the Stooges are represented by Los Angeles-based Comedy III Productions, which handles requests for merchandise or other tie-ins. "Lugosi as Dracula created a whole new genre in American film," says his son, Bela G. Lugosi, now a lawyer who owns the rights to his dad's name. "His image is recognized around the world." Lugosi also specializes in the representation of other heirs who seek protection from manufacturers who illegally profit from famous names. 
  3. ^ The Haunted World of Edward D. Wood, Jr., dir. Brett Thompson, 1996
  4. ^ Nightmare of Ecstasy: The Life and Art of Edward D. Wood, Jr. Rudolph Grey, 1994