Bread bun (hieroglyph)

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X1
t
(or "feminine")

Bread bun
"semicircle"
in hieroglyphs
(detailed) Close-up of hieroglyphs; 2 uses of t.

The Ancient Egyptian Bread bun hieroglyph is Gardiner sign listed no. X1 for the side view of a bread bun. It is also the simple shape of a semicircle. The hieroglyph is listed under the Gardiner category of loaves and cakes.

The bread bun hieroglyph is used in the Ancient Egyptian language hieroglyphs for the alphabetic consonant letter t.[1] A later alternative t, is a pestle, with curved top, Gardiner U33.
U33

Besides alphabetic-t, the bread bun is used for words that are feminine, as an end qualifying determinant, often shown before other qualifying ideograms or determinants in the hieroglyphic word block.

Narmer Palette detail, from early 3rd millennium Ancient Egypt.

Palermo Stone[edit]

The t hieroglyph is used extensively throughout the Palermo Stone of the 24th to 23rd century BC, and it is used in the first row (Row I of VI), for the naming of King Tiu of Lower Egypt (a King of the North).

Nile River flood levels recorded on 1-piece of the 7—piece Palermo Stone. (Note the 2-uses of t.)

Palermo Stone, King Series, Row I (predynastic)[edit]

The following is the list of predynastic pharaohs (Nile Delta north) represented on the Palermo Piece of the 7–piece Palermo Stone: The sequence is in the proper order with the beginning Pharaoh on the right: (reading right-to-left, seven complete names pictured in year-registers):


 
G17
F32
 
M13
K5
 
N35
U14
 
V13
N39
 
X1 M17
G43
 
L6
E9
 
S29
D28
Palermo piece (at Palermo Museum), of the 7—piece Palermo Stone.

Note: On the Palermo Stone all the hieroglyphs face in the other direction (Gardiner signs are only facing left; on the stone they face right (reading right-to-left)). The source of the following Pharaohs is only from this King List; a few have artifacts that further confirm their reign (the Double Falcon King). The pharaohs deficient in information are: Hsekiu, Khayu, Tiu (pharaoh), Thesh, Neheb, Wazner, Mekh.

Preceded by
 

(start
of T)
X1

Breadbun
or
"feminine"

t
Succeeded by
N16

Land

ti

The Egyptian hieroglyph alphabetic letters[edit]

The following two tables show the Egyptian uniliteral signs. (24 letters, but multiple use hieroglyphs)

a
G1
i
M17
y
M17 M17
'
D36
(w,u)
G43
B
b
P
p
F
f
M
G17
N
N35
R
D21
H1
h
H2
H
Kh1
Aa1
Kh2
F32
S
O34
(Sh)=Š
N37
Q/K2
N29
K
k
G
g
T
t
ChTj
V13
D
d
Dj
I10
L/(R)
(special)
(Ptolemaic,
etc.)
E23
-- -- -- -- --
a i
(ee)
y
ii
'
ah, (aïn)
w, (u)
(oo)
B
P F M N R H1
H2 (Kh)1 (Kh)2 S Sh
(Sh)
K
emphatic
K G T Tj
Ch
Tsh
D Dj
(additionally 4
for vert/horiz)
-- -- -- -- --
Aa15

M
(horiz)
M2-Plinth
S3

N
(vert)
(see:
N (red crown))
S29

S
(vert)
S (folded)
cloth)
Egyptian-M.png
M
(3rd-M
-2nd-vert)
M3-Baker's tool
(vertical)
(additionally 3
for equivalents)
-- -- -- -- --
M17 M17 (2 reeds)

is—
Z4 (2 strokes)

y2-Two strokes
G43 (quail)

is—
Z7 (coil)

letter w, u
(see w2-Coil)
U33

T
(no. 2)
T2-Pestle

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schumann-Antelme, and Rossini, 1998. Illustrated Hieroglyphics Handbook, uniliteral: U23, p. 62-63.
  • Schumann-Antelme, and Rossini, 1998. Illustrated Hieroglyphics Handbook, Ruth Schumann-Antelme, and Stéphane Rossini. c 1998, English trans. 2002, Sterling Publishing Co. (Index, Summary lists (tables), selected uniliterals, biliterals, and triliterals.) (softcover, ISBN 1-4027-0025-3)