Breakers (TV series)

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Breakers
Breakers
Title screen
Genre Soap
drama
Directed by Alan Coleman
Starring Helen O'Connor
Richard Healy
John Atkinson
Jason Crewes
James Stewart
Ada Nicodemou
Preben Warren
Paul Pantano
Heath Bergerson
Ben Tate
Louise Crawford
Simon Munro
Don Hany
Angela Keep
Emily Perry
Simone Robertson
Julie Haseler
Ling Hsueh Tang
Jean-Marc Russ
Shae Potter
Emma Kenny
Samantha Kenny
Opening theme Mike Perjanik
Composer(s) John Ertler
Country of origin Australia
No. of episodes 430
Production
Executive producer(s) David Gould
Running time 25 mins
Broadcast
Original channel Network Ten
Original run 2 February 1998 – 3 November 1999

Breakers is an Australian television series, that was made and aired on Network Ten between 1998 and 1999. It was shown in Ireland on TV3 and City Channel. It was also screened on BBC One in the United Kingdom and TV4 in New Zealand.

Premise[edit]

The series revolves around The Breakers building situated near Bondi Beach, and the lives of the people who work and live there. The building houses three businesses all run by the same family. Breaker's Modelling School is run by Paul Simmons, The Breaker, a local newspaper is run by Eve, Paul's ex-wife, and Kate's Cafe, run by Kate Markham, Eve's sister. During its short run the series dealt with some controversial story lines and was not afraid to confront contentious issues, such as homosexuality and teenage suicide.

Schedulling[edit]

Unusually, the program aired outside of prime-time; with each episode was aired mid afternoon each weekday and then repeated late that night.

Reaction[edit]

It was Breakers' somewhat edgy reputation coupled with low ratings that eventually led to the series being cancelled.

The show was purchased by the BBC amid a flurry of media coverage and outrage, with some describing the show an Australian version of EastEnders. The Sun newspaper did a special feature of the show, covering some of the risque and controversial storylines. However when the show finally debuted viewers were disappointed with the bland and familiar storylines, and ratings very quickly fell. The show was then shunted around the schedule to try to find an audience. It eventually moved to BBC2 but with ratings continuing to fall the show finished it run on BBC Choice. After its run on the BBC it was shown on small digital channel NBS in the UK.

Australian Senator Karen Synon considered the depiction of Lucy Hill, in a lesbian relationship to be "inappropriate" given the program's afternoon timeslot, and requested the Australian Broadcasting Authority investigate if the show had breached broadcasting guidelines. The ABA told The Daily Telegraph that the storyline was "normal" and the show's PG rating appropriate for the timeslot.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mercado, Andrew (2004). Super Aussie soaps: behind the scenes of Australia's best loved TV shows. Sydney: Pluto Press. pp. 349–350. ISBN 1-86403-191-3. 

External links[edit]