British Horse Driving Trials Association

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The British Horse Driving Trials Association is the governing body for the sport of Horse Driving Trials in Great Britain. The association is responsible for selection of Team GBR competitors to represent Great Britain at World Carriage Driving Championships.[1] It is one of the 18 organisations which form part of the British Equestrian Federation.[2]

Administration[edit]

The British Horse Driving Trials Association Ltd is a company limited by guarantee,[3] and is administered by a council, consisting of a chairman, vice-chairman and nine elected Council members, who serve for a period of three years, with the chair and vice-chair elected annually.

The association also appoints officials to run the day to day business of the association, including company secretary, executive officer, treasurer, bookkeeper, child protection officer and lead welfare officer.

The chairman and council also appoint a number of committees to facilitate operations within the organisation, with each of the five "umbrella" committees being chaired by a council member. The committees are:

  • finance & general purposes committee
  • competitions committee
  • training committee
  • marketing committee
  • international committee

The company annual general meeting is held in October. It is combined with a one day members' conference, where council officials present reports on the running and performance of the company and its financial status. This is followed by an open forum discussion.

Notable members[edit]

Members of the association include the Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.[4]

See also[edit]

British Equestrian Federation International Federation for Equestrian Sports

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Devon's pony driving hopefuls". BBC Devon. 2008-01-11. 
  2. ^ "Member Bodies". British Equestrian Federation. 
  3. ^ "company search". Companies House. 
  4. ^ Booker, Christopher (2003-02-16). "How to fix horse races". The Daily Telegraph.