Bucksport, South Carolina

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Bucksport, South Carolina
CDP
Along the Intracoastal Waterway at Bucksport
Along the Intracoastal Waterway at Bucksport
Location of Bucksport inSouth Carolina
Location of Bucksport in
South Carolina
Coordinates: 33°40′37″N 79°6′54″W / 33.67694°N 79.11500°W / 33.67694; -79.11500Coordinates: 33°40′37″N 79°6′54″W / 33.67694°N 79.11500°W / 33.67694; -79.11500
Country United States
State South Carolina
County Horry
Area
 • Total 3.9 sq mi (10 km2)
 • Land 3.8 sq mi (9.9 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 876
 • Density 227/sq mi (87.6/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 29527
Area code(s) 843
FIPS code 45-10000[1]
GNIS feature ID 1231099[2]

Bucksport is a census-designated place (CDP) in Horry County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 876 at the 2010 census. It is also a rural port on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at the merger point with the Waccamaw River. The port has some services available for boaters and is also home to the Bucksport Restaurant.

Geography[edit]

Bucksport is located at 33°40′37″N 79°6′54″W / 33.67694°N 79.11500°W / 33.67694; -79.11500 (33.676876, -79.114896).[3]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10 km2), of which, 3.8 square miles (9.8 km2) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) of it (0.52%) is water.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,117 people, 359 households, and 285 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 290.8 people per square mile (112.3/km²). There were 388 housing units at an average density of 101.0/sq mi (39.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 2.24% White, 96.60% African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.18% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.09% of the population.

There were 359 households out of which 36.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.4% were married couples living together, 34.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.6% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.11 and the average family size was 3.53.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 32.9% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 18.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 86.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.3 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $24,038, and the median income for a family was $23,750. Males had a median income of $31,618 versus $19,186 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $10,832. About 14.9% of families and 20.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.6% of those under age 18 and 35.6% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation[edit]

Airports[edit]

History[edit]

Henry Buck of Bucksport, Maine moved to South Carolina in the 1820s to start lumber mills; Horry County had a significant timber industry with its cypress, pine and hardwood forests. One of Buck's mills was in what became Bucksport. Sawmills in Bucksport and Bucksville produced 3 million board feet of lumber annually by 1850. Buck used his ships to transport lumber to Georgetown and Charleston in South Carolina and as far away as New York City and Boston, and even to other countries. Lumber from Buck's operation even went into the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge. The Independent Republic Quarterly said, "By 1860, due largely to Bucksville and Bucksport, Horry District had become one of the five greatest timber-producing districts in the state."[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ Dickerson, Brad (2011-04-11). "Horry County was lukewarm to secession calls in Civil War days". The Sun News. Retrieved 2011-04-11.