Carl Bell (physician)

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Carl Compton Bell (born October 28, 1947 in Chicago) is a professor of psychiatry and public health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Bell is a National Institute of Mental Health international researcher, an author of more than 450 books, chapters, and articles addressing issues of violence prevention, HIV prevention, isolated sleep paralysis, misdiagnosis of Manic depressive illness, and children exposed to violence.[1][2][3][4]

Bell is the President/C.E.O. of the Community Mental Health Council, Inc.[5] a large not-for-profit community mental health centers in the U.S. He is also the Director of the Institute for Juvenile Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

In October 2011, Bell received the American Psychiatric Association’s annual Solomon Carter Fuller Award at APA’s Institute on Psychiatric Services in San Francisco.[1]

Biography[edit]

Bell was born in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood, and graduated from Hyde Park High School in 1965.[6] After graduating from the University of Illinois in 1967 with a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Biology,[7] he went on to Meharry Medical College [8] where he graduated with an M.D. His postgraduate training in psychiatry was at the Illinois State Psychiatric Institute in Chicago. After his residency he went to the United States Navy from 1974 to 1976 after which he began his career as a community psychiatrist on Chicago’s Southside,[9] working in health facilities including Jackson Park Hospital and the Community Mental Health Council, which he helped to build up to a large, comprehensive mental health center, which also advises other nonprofit and public entities focused on mental health through their Institute for Managerial and Clinical Consultation.

During 35 years, Bell has published over 450 articles on mental health[1][10] and written a book, "Sanity of Survival." He is editor of Psychiatric Perspectives on Violence: Understanding Causes and Issues in Prevention and Treatment; author of Getting Rid of Rats: Perspectives of a Black Community Psychiatrist; co-author of Suicide and Homicide Among Adolescents and chapters on: "Black Psychiatry" in Mental Health and People of Color; "Black-on-Black Homicide" in Mental Health and Mental Illness Among Black Americans; "Isolated Sleep Paralysis" & "Violence Exposure, Psychological Distress and High Risk Behaviors Among Inner-City High School Students" in Anxiety Disorders in African-Americans; "Is psychoanalytic therapy relevant for public mental health programs" in Controversial Issues in Mental Health; and "Prevention of Black Homicide" in The State of Black America 1995. He's the subject of countless interviews in Ebony; Jet; Essence; Emerge; New York Times; Chicago Tribune Magazine; People Magazine; and Chicago Reporter. TV shows, such as "Nightline", "CBS Sunday Morning", "The News Hour with Jim Lehrer," and the "Today Show" have utilized his expert opinion. He's also lectured internationally on various topics.[11]

Bell is a member and Former Chairman of the National Medical Association's Section on Psychiatry; a Fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists; a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a Founding Member and Past Board Chairman of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. Bell was the E.Y. Williams Distinguished Senior Clinical Scholar Award of the Section on Psychiatry of the National Medical Association in 1992. He received the American Psychiatric Association President's Commendation - Violence in 1997. He was appointed to the Violence Against Women Advisory Council by Janet Reno the Attorney General Department of Justice and Donna Shalala Secretary Department of Health and Human Services - 1995-2000, and was a participant - White House's Strategy Session on Children, Violence, and Responsibility. He was appointed to the working group for Dr. Satcher's Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health - Culture, Race, and Ethnicity and appointed to the Planning Board for the Surgeon General's Report on Youth Violence.[12]

Memberships[edit]

  • Member, National Medical Association. Former Chairman, Section on Psychiatry.
  • Member, Black Psychiatrists of America.[10]
  • Former vice-president, former newsletter editor.
  • Fellow: American College of Psychiatrists - 1998, Board of Regents - 2006 to 2009.[13] - & American Psychiatric Association - 1985.
  • Founding Member and Past Board Chairman, National Commission on Correctional Health Care.
  • Member and Former Director, American Association of Community Psychiatrists.
  • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology - 1976; Board Examiner since 1978.

Award[edit]

In October 2011, Bell received the American Psychiatric Association’s annual Solomon Carter Fuller Award at APA’s 2011 Institute on Psychiatric Services in San Francisco. The award honors “a black citizen who pioneered an area which has significantly benefited the quality of life for black people.”[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]