Carolyn Cooper

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Carolyn Cooper CD is a West Indian author, professor, and literary scholar. Her academic approach is grounded in critical theory. Born in Jamaica, Dr. Cooper currently heads the department of Literary and Cultural Studies at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. For more than 26 years she has lectured at the University of the West Indies, Department of Literature in English.

Biography[edit]

Carolyn Joy Cooper[1] was born in 1950[2] in Kingston, Jamaica, to parents who were involved in the Seventh-day Adventist Church.[3]

In 1968 she was awarded the Jamaica Scholarship, which three years later culminated with her receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in English (B.A. English). In 1972 she proceeded to the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to pursue her Master's degree in English, which was followed by the completion of her Ph. D at the same institution.[3]

She is professor of literary and cultural studies at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. She was instrumental in establishing in 1994 the university's Reggae Studies Unit, where numerous conferences on the music have been convened, including in 2008 the Global Reggae Conference,[4] the plenary papers for which are collected in Global Reggae (2012), edited by Cooper. She also served as editor for Bob Marley: The Man and His Music (2003), and is the author of the books Noises in the Blood: Orality, Gender and the "Vulgar" Body of Jamaican Popular Culture (1993) and Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large (2004). Cooper is a weekly columnist for the Sunday Gleaner and hosts a television show for the Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation.[4]

The Jamaica Gleaner listed Carolyn Cooper as 6th in their list of "The 10 Best-Dressed Men & Women Of 2011".[5]

In 6 August 2013, Jamaica's 51st Independence Day, Professor Carolyn Cooper was awarded the national honour of the Order of Distinction in the rank of Commander (CD) "for outstanding contribution to Education".[1][6]

Bibliography[edit]

  • (edited) Global Reggae, 2012
  • Sound Clash: Jamaican Dancehall Culture at Large, 2004
  • (with Eleanor Wint, eds) Bob Marley: The Man and His Music, 2003
  • Noises In The Blood: Orality, Gender and the "Vulgar" Body of Jamaican Popular Culture, 1995

Selected articles[edit]

  • "Enslaved In Stereotypes: Race and Representation in Post-independence Jamaica", Small Axe, 16, 2004, pp. 154–169.
  • "Punany Powah", Black Media Journal, 2, 2000, pp. 50–52.
  • "'West Indies plight': Louise Bennett and The Cultural Politics of Federation", Social and Economic Studies, 48, 1999, pp. 211–228.
  • "Ragamuffin sounds: Crossing over from reggae to rap and back", Caribbean Quarterly, Vol. 44, nos. 1&2, 1998, pp. 153–168.
  • "Race and the cultural politics of self-representation: A View from the University of the West Indies", Research in African Literatures, 27, 1996, pp. 97–105.
  • "Lyrical Gun: Metaphor and Role Play in Jamaican Dancehall Culture", The Massachusetts Review, Vol. 35 Issues 3 & 4, 1994, pp. 429–447.
  • "Loosely talking theory: Oral/Sexual Discourse in Jamaican Popular Culture", The CRNLE Reviews Journal, 1, 1994, pp. 62–73.

Awards[edit]

  • Association of Commonwealth Universities Academic Exchange Fellow, University of the South Pacific, Fiji, September - October, 1993
  • Order of Distinction in the rank of Commander (CD), August 2013

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Honours and Awards, Office of the Prime Minister, Jamaica.
  2. ^ Library of Congress Catalog Record.
  3. ^ a b Dawes, Mark (9 September 2003). "Carolyn Cooper, I'm a bald head Rasta". Jamaica Gleaner. Retrieved 6 November 2010. 
  4. ^ a b Carolyn Cooper biography, The Leslie Center for the Humanities, Dartmouth College.
  5. ^ "The 10 Best-Dressed Men & Women Of 2011", The Gleaner, 5 February 2012.
  6. ^ "The Arts Play Big Part In This Year's National Honours", The Gleaner, 7 August 2013.

External links[edit]