Chicagoan (ATSF train)

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Chicagoan
Kansas Cityan
Overview
Type Inter-city rail
System AT&SF
Termini Chicago, Illinois
Wichita, Kansas, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Dallas, Texas
Operation
Opening April 10, 1938
Closed April 18, 1968[1]
Owner AT&SF
Operator(s) AT&SF
Technical
Line length 663 mi (1,067.00 km)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)

The Chicagoan and Kansas Cityan were a pair of American named passenger trains operated by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. They ran from Chicago, Illinois to Wichita, Kansas, with a later extension to Oklahoma City.

On April 17, 1938, the Santa Fe introduced a pair of day trains using lightweight, streamlined cars from the Budd Company. These two, seven-car, lightweight, streamlined trains operated the 663-mile (1,067 km) route in 12 3/4 hours between end points. Shortly after entering service the train's western terminal would be moved to Oklahoma City, extending running times by three hours.

The inaugural runs of the two lightweight streamliners were operated with Electro-Motive Corporation E1A units numbered 8 and 9, but within a month the Santa Fe assigned 1 and 10 the numbers of the old Santa Fe Box Cab Diesel Passenger units 1A and 1B. After being rebuilt in the Santa Fe's Topeka Shops with an elevated cab at one end only and a new nose added at that same end, they really resembled two E1A units that had been involved in a head on collision, and the shops repainted the results in the Santa Fe "war bonnet" paint scheme. These became the regular power for the trains.[citation needed]

The Chicagoan and Kansas Cityan received new full-length "Big Dome" lounges in 1954.[2]

Train consists[edit]

At the train's inception, each of the two trainsets consisted of the following units:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bartels, Michael (April 2008). "Great Plains Dispatcher" (PDF). Newsletter. Great Plains Transportation Museum and the Wichita Chapter National Railway Historical Society. p. 4. Retrieved 2009-10-03. 
  2. ^ Wayner, Robert J., ed. (1972). Car Names, Numbers and Consists. New York: Wayner Publications. p. 196. OCLC 8848690. 
  • The Streamlined Passenger Trains of the United States and Canada by Alan L. Pettet