Children with Leukaemia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Children with Cancer UK, formerly 'Children With Leukaemia' is a British charitable organisation, inaugurated by Diana, Princess of Wales on 12 January 1988, that provides funding for research into the prevention and cure of all childhood cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (lymphoid) (ALL) and Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It also supports families through welfare programmes and campaigns on their behalf. Children with Cancer UK is a member of the Association of Medical Research Charities and the National Cancer Research Institute[4].

The organisation’s objects are[1]

  • to promote the relief of children and young people suffering from leukaemia or any other form of cancer (and allied disorders) and of their families;
  • to raise public awareness and knowledge in matters relating to leukaemia or any other form of cancer (and allied disorders) affecting children and young people;
  • to promote research into the causes, alleviation, prevention, treatment and cure of leukaemia or any other form of cancer (and allied disorders) affecting children and young people and to publish the useful results of such research.

Children with Cancer UK was constituted as a charity under a Trust Deed dated 4 January 1988, in memory of Paul O'Gorman who died of leukaemia on 6 February 1987 and his sister Jean, who died on 3 November 1987, also of cancer.[2]

Funding research[edit]

Children with Cancer UK has become a major funder of scientific research and since 2004 this funding has been granted by a peer-reviewed process as recognised by the Association of Medical Research Charities.[3] Applications for funding are initially reviewed by a panel made up of at least two members of the organisation’s Scientific Advisory Committee[4] and relevant external reviewers from within the appropriate scientific field. This process results in the funding of world-class research.

Children with Cancer UK research endeavours to investigate what causes childhood cancer and, ultimately, how to prevent it.

Children with Cancer UK is working to develop treatments which are not only more effective, driving up the survival rate, but which are less punishing, reducing the risk of the side-effects associated with current treatments.[5]

Welfare initiatives[edit]

Children with Cancer UK allocates significant funding towards welfare projects that are designed to help children and families cope with the trauma of leukaemia diagnosis and treatment.[6]

Funding of childhood leukaemia research centres
The Paul O’Gorman Childhood Leukaemia Research Centre[7] at Great Ormond Street opened in 1995 and now houses one of the UK’s leading leukaemia research teams.

Since then Children with Cancer UK has helped to develop many other childhood leukaemia research centres on the UK – including centres in Bristol, Glasgow, Manchester and Newcastle.[8]

Raising awareness[edit]

Little is currently known about what causes children to develop cancer. The number of new cases being diagnosed has been increasing, suggesting that aspects of our changing lifestyle may play a role.[9]

Children with Cancer UK is working with policy makers to raise awareness of the association between childhood leukaemia and high-voltage power lines. It is seeking to gain support for a building moratorium to stop new houses being built near power lines.[10]

Children with Cancer UK raises awareness of childhood cancers by providing information to the public on new scientific research and through celebrity appeals and fundraising efforts.[11]

Children with Cancer UK have a Facebook page [12] and Twitter feed [13]

Events[edit]

Children with Cancer UK hosts a variety of fundraising events throughout the year. Some of these include the Opera at Syon, the Children with Cancer Ball and Tarrant's Quiz Party.[14]

The organisation also offers a variety of opportunities for individual fundraising including bike rides and treks.[15] It organises Overseas Challenges for individuals to explore the world and raise money.

Children with Cancer UK launched their Bake Club in 2013, s a fun, simple and exciting way to raise money for Children with Cancer UK in your own home, workplace or local community. Simply bake and sell anything from cupcakes to cookies, chocolate crispy cakes to a Victoria sponge and raise funds to save more young lives.[16]

It also offers help and advice to individuals or groups that wish to organise their own events or challenges for fundraising.

Funding[edit]

Children with Cancer UK receives no government funding and relies entirely on voluntary donations.[17]

A substantial amount of the money needed to fund research is obtained through fundraising events. Examples of such events include The Children with Cancer Ball.[18]

Children with Cancer UK is supported by many famous friends,[19] volunteers as well as individuals and businesses who help raise funds.

Children with Cancer UK has large teams for the major running events including the London and New York City Marathons and the Great North Run. Children with Cancer UK: our running events

Children with Cancer UK lso encourage schools and children's groups to get involved in fundraising with their Cheeky Monkey Challenge website

References[edit]

External links[edit]