Class, Bureaucracy, and Schools

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Class, Bureaucracy, and Schools: The Illusion of Educational Change in America is a 1971 book by American historian Michael B. Katz.[1] The book focuses on the history of education in the United States between 1800 and 1885 in public elementary schools, and follows their transition from one-room schools to centralized, bureaucratic school systems.[2] The book was revised and expanded in 1975.

Publication history[edit]

  • Class, Bureaucracy and Schools: The Illusion of Educational Change in America, Praeger (New York City), 1971, revised edition, 1975.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lazerson, M. (1973). Class, Bureaucracy and Schools: The Illusion of Educational Change in America. Harvard Educational Review.
  2. ^ Suzuki, Bob H. (1998). Education and the Socialization of Asian Americans: A Revisionist Analysis of the'Model Minority' Thesis. In Franklin Ng (Ed.), Asian American Interethnic Relations and Politics, pp. 41-69, Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0815326890.

Further reading[edit]

  • Michaelsen, Jacob B. (1977). Revision, Bureaucracy, and School Reform: A Critique of Katz. The School Review. 85(2): 229-246. JSTOR 1084622
  • Wise, Arthur E. (1982). Legislated Learning: The Bureaucratization of the American Classroom. University of California Press. ISBN 0520047923.