Committee of 300

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The Committee of 300, also known as The Olympians, is a group alleged to have been founded by the British aristocracy in 1727.[1] Proponents of the theory alleging the Committee's existence believe it to be an international council that organizes politics, commerce, banking, media, and the military for centralized global efforts.

Background[edit]

The theory dates to a statement made by Walther Rathenau in a 1909 article "Geschäftlicher Nachwuchs" in Neue freie Presse:[2]

Dreihundert Männer, von denen jeder jeden kennt, leiten die wirtschaftliche Geschicke des Kontinents und suchen sich Nachfolger aus ihrer Umgebung.

This could be translated as "Three hundred men, all of whom know one another, guide the economic destinies of the Continent and seek their successors from within their own environment."[3]

In context, Rathenau was actually deploring the oligarchic implications of this statement, and did not suggest that the "Three hundred" were Jewish. However, by 1912 Theodor Fritsch had seized upon the sentence as an "open confession of indubitable Jewish hegemony" and as proof that Rathenau was the "secret Kaiser of Germany." The idea became more popular after the First World War, and the spread of the Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion. Rathenau addressed the issue in a 1921 letter, stating that the three hundred referred to were leaders in the business world, rather than Jews.[4]

After Rathenau's assassination in June 1922, one of his assassins explicitly cited Rathenau's membership in the "Three hundred Elders of Zion" as justification for the killing. This prompted the Reichstag to pass a Law for the Protection of the Republic making propagation of the myth a prosecutable offense. Nevertheless, it was still used by the Nazis before and after they took power.[5]

Later theories[edit]

Former British MI6 intelligence officer John Coleman's book, The Conspirators Hierarchy, the Committee of 300,[6] details what Coleman claims is his first-hand information and encounters with this group.

Coleman claims the alleged group to be superior to other more well-known round table groups such as the Bilderberg Group, the Royal Institute of International Affairs, the Club of Rome, the Trilateral Commission and the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Coleman's book has been translated into German,[7] Russian, Serbian and Bulgarian.[8]

Arthur Cherep-Spiridovich writes that the group may also be known as the "Hidden Hand", which is headed by the Rothschild family of international financiers and based loosely around many of the top national banking institutions and royal families of the world.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bennett, Richard M. (2003). Conspiracy: Plots, Lies and Cover-ups. Virgin. pp. 27–28. ISBN 978-1-85227-093-3. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Rathenau, Walther, 1867-1922 Zur Kritik der Zeit Berlin, S. Fischer 1922 p.207
  3. ^ Mark Swartzburg The "Three hundred" in Richard S. Levy, ed. Antisemitism: a historical encyclopedia of prejudice and persecution Santa Babara, California; ABC-CLIO 2005 p.705
  4. ^ Swartzburg pp.705-6
  5. ^ Swartzburg p.706
  6. ^ "Conspirators' Hierarchy - The Story of the Committee of 300"
  7. ^ Promotion in German "Das Komitee der 300: Die Hierarchie der Verschwörer"
  8. ^ http://rasper-bg.com/?p=985
  9. ^ "The Secret World Government or Hidden Hand"