Copacetic

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This article is about the album by Velocity Girl. For definition and etymology of the English word, see Wiktionary:copacetic.
Copacetic
Studio album by Velocity Girl
Released 1993
Recorded Memphis, 1993
Genre Indie rock, Indie pop
Label Sub Pop
Velocity Girl chronology
1st
Velocity Girl
(1993)
2nd
Copacetic
(1993)
3rd
Simpatico
(1994)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]
Lime Lizard (neutral)[2]
Rolling Stone 4/5 stars[3]

Copacetic is an album by Velocity Girl, released in 1993. It is their first full-length album and features the singles "Crazy Town" and "Audrey's Eyes," both of which were given music videos. The album's title derives from an American slang word meaning "everything's ok".[4] Kelly Riles described the recording of the album: "We mixed the album in a very different way than people would have expected us to—it's very rough sounding. It's a deliberate move away from the lighter production on the singles".[4]

A review in Lime Lizard at the time of its release drew comparisons with My Bloody Valentine, stating "this could be the rejected demos for Isn't Anything".[2]

The album was listed among "75 Lost Classics" in the Spring 2007 issue of Magnet.[5]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Pretty Sister" (4:59)
  2. "Crazy Town" (3:47)
  3. "Copacetic" (3:41)
  4. "Here Comes" (4:42)
  5. "Pop Loser" (2:24)
  6. "Living Well" (3:06)
  7. "A Chang" (5:48)
  8. "Audrey's Eyes" (3:02)
  9. "Lisa Librarian" (2:18)
  10. "57 Waltz" (2:49)
  11. "Candy Apples" (3:07)
  12. "Catching Squirrels" (5:42)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Huey, Steve "Copacetic Review", Allmusic, Macrovision Corporation, retrieved 24 October 2009
  2. ^ a b Grundy, Gareth (1993) "Velocity Girl Copacetic", Lime Lizard, May 1993, p. 59
  3. ^ Diehl, Matt (1993) "Album Reviews: Velocity Girl - Copacetic", Rolling Stone, Issue 658
  4. ^ a b Bonner, Michael (1993) "Velocity Girl: Cop This", Lime Lizard, May 1993, p. 74
  5. ^ Magnet Magazine's "75 Lost Classics": We Found Eight of Them (SubPop Records)

External links[edit]