Automotive Crash Injury Research Center

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The 1957 Cornell-Liberty Safety Car on display at the Henry Ford Museum in 2012.

The Automotive Crash Injury Research Center was begun in 1952 by John O. Moore at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, which spun off in 1972 as Calspan Corporation.[1] It pioneered the use of crash testing, originally using corpses rather than dummies. The project discovered that improved door locks, energy-absorbing steering wheels, padded dashboards, and seat belts could prevent an extraordinary percentage of injuries.[1] The project led Liberty Mutual to fund the building of a demonstration Cornell Safety Car in 1956, which received national publicity and influenced carmakers.[1] Carmakers soon started their own crash-test laboratories and gradually adopted many of the Cornell innovations.

The Cornell Safety Car was produced by the Automotive Crash Injury Research project, begun in 1952 by John O. Moore at the Cornell Aeronautical Research Laboratories (spun off in 1972 as Calspan Corporation) at Cornell University. It pioneered the first-ever use of crash testing (originally using corpses rather than dummies). The project discovered that an extraordinary percentage of injuries could be prevented by improved door locks, energy-absorbing steering wheels, padded dashboards, and seat belts. The project led to Liberty Mutual's funding the building of a demonstration Cornell Safety Car in 1956, which received national publicity, and influenced carmakers. Carmakers started their own crash-test laboratories and gradually adopted the main Cornell innovations, all now taken for granted (although others, such as rear-facing passenger seats, never found favor with carmakers or the public).

See also[edit]

Media related to Cornell Safety Car at Wikimedia Commons

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Calspan Company History and Timeline". Calspan Corp. Archived from the original on March 21, 2006. Retrieved June 2, 2006.