Daoud Hari

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Daoud Hari (aka "Suleyman Abakar Moussa") is a Sudanese tribesman from the Darfur region of Sudan.[1] He has worked as a language interpreter and guide for NGO's and the press on fact-finding trips into the war-torn and dangerous Darfur area.[1] Hari was captured and detained by the government of Sudan as a spy in August 2006 along with Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Paul Salopek and their Chadian driver Abdulraham Anu (aka "Ali").[2][3] During their months-long ordeal all three men were severely beaten and deprived.[1] The American journalist knew that the Sudanese government did not want to risk more bad publicity on his death and so eventually all three were released. Upon their successful release - after an international outcry from US diplomats, the US military, Bono and even the Pope[1] - Hari moved to the US where he began work on his memoirs to help bring further world attention to the plight of his people and country.[1] In 2008 he published his memoirs under the title The Translator: A Tribesman's Memoir of Darfur.[1] By telling his story he hopes someone will listen and send help to his people so eventually they can move back to their land and live a peaceful life.

Daoud Hari is also known as Suleyman Abakar Moussa. As he explains in his memoir,[1] this is a false identity he created to appear as a citizen of Chad in order that he might work in the Sudanese refugee camps in Chad as an interpreter (by Chad law, only Chadian citizens are allowed to work).

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  • The Translator: A Tribesman's Memoir of Darfur. New York: Random House, March 18, 2008. ISBN 978-1-4000-6744-2