David Andrews (Irish politician)

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David Andrews
Minister for Foreign Affairs
In office
8 October 1997 – 27 January 2000
Preceded by Ray Burke
Succeeded by Brian Cowen
In office
11 February 1992 – 12 January 1993
Preceded by Gerry Collins
Succeeded by Dick Spring
Minister for Defence
In office
26 June 1997 – 8 October 1997
Preceded by Seán Barrett
Succeeded by Michael Smith
In office
12 January 1993 – 15 December 1994
Preceded by John Wilson
Succeeded by Hugh Coveney
Minister for the Marine
In office
12 January 1993 – 15 December 1994
Preceded by Michael Smith
Succeeded by Hugh Coveney
Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs
In office
5 July 1977 – 11 December 1979
Preceded by New office
Succeeded by Office abolished
Government Chief Whip
In office
8 May 1970 – 14 March 1973
Preceded by Desmond O'Malley
Succeeded by John Kelly
Teachta Dála
In office
April 1965 – May 2002
Constituency Dún Laoghaire
Personal details
Born (1936-03-15) 15 March 1936 (age 78)
Dublin, Ireland
Nationality Irish
Political party Fianna Fáil

David Andrews (born 15 March 1936) is a former Irish Fianna Fáil politician and barrister.[1]

Andrews was first elected to Dáil Éireann at the 1965 general election as a Fianna Fáil Teachta Dála (TD) for the Dún Laoghaire and Rathdown constituency.[2] From 1970 to 1973 he served as Parliamentary Secretary to the Taoiseach[1] with special responsibility as Chief Whip. Following four years in opposition Jack Lynch and Fianna Fáil were back in power in 1977, and Andrews was appointed Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs.[1] In the 1979 Fianna Fáil leadership election Andrews supported George Colley,[3] the favoured candidate of the existing leadership. However, Charles Haughey, in a very close vote, was elected leader and Taoiseach.

Andrews paid for backing Colley in the leadership bid, being confined to the backbenches during Haughey's thirteen-year period as leader. During this period he maintained his legal practice and campaigned for the Guildford Four, the Birmingham Six, and Brian Keenan. He remained a vocal critic of Haughey during this period.[3] After the Progressive Democrats were founded in 1985 Andrews considered joining the new party.[3] In 1992 Albert Reynolds replaced Haughey as Taoiseach and Andrews was briefly appointed Minister for Foreign Affairs, vacating this position to Dick Spring, Tánaiste and Labour Party leader, after a subsequent election. Andrews was then appointed Minister for Defence and the Marine. In 1997 subsequent to a general election, Fianna Fáil were back in coalition with the Progressive Democrats, with Bertie Ahern as Taoiseach. Andrews was first appointed Minister for Defence, subsequently, after the resignation of Ray Burke becoming Minister for Foreign Affairs.[1][4]

His period as foreign minister was successful regarding the Northern Ireland peace talks.[5] In April 1998 the Good Friday Agreement was adopted by the people of the Republic and Northern Ireland. In 1999, Ireland joined the Partnership for Peace project. Andrews retired as Minister for Foreign Affairs in January 2000. He retired from Dáil Éireann at the 2002 general election, his son Barry was elected for the Dún Laoghaire constituency, his other son David Andrews, Jnr is a comedian who works under the pseudonym of David McSavage. His brother Niall Andrews was a TD and MEP. On retirement from politics, he was appointed Chairman of the insurance company, MGM International.[citation needed]

In May 2000, he was appointed to the non-executive position as Chairman of the Irish Red Cross Society, serving in that position until 2009.[6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Mr. David Andrews". Oireachtas Members Database. Retrieved 15 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "David Andrews". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 15 January 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c Kingstown Republican, 2007. New Island
  4. ^ "Andrews to resign from cabinet on Wednesday". RTÉ News. 21 January 2000. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  5. ^ "Where Are They Now: David Andrews". Irish Independent. 9 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "Andrews to retire as Red Cross chairman". RTÉ News. 17 November 2009. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  7. ^ "Dáil debate on reform of the Irish Red Cross". KildareStreet.com. 15 December 2010. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Desmond O'Malley
Government Chief Whip
1970–1973
Succeeded by
John Kelly
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Defence
1970–1973
New office Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Foreign Affairs
1977–1978
Succeeded by
Himself
as Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs
Preceded by
Himself
as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Foreign Affairs
Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs
1978–1979
Office abolished
Preceded by
Gerry Collins
Minister for Foreign Affairs
1992–1993
Succeeded by
Dick Spring
Preceded by
John Wilson
Minister for Defence
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Hugh Coveney
Preceded by
Michael Woods
Minister for the Marine
1993–1994
Preceded by
Seán Barrett
Minister for Defence
1997
Succeeded by
Michael Smith
Preceded by
Ray Burke
Minister for Foreign Affairs
1997–2000
Succeeded by
Brian Cowen