David D. Balam

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Asteroids discovered: 51
4789 Sprattia October 20, 1987
6532 Scarfe January 4, 1995
7886 Redman August 12, 1993
11955 Russrobb February 8, 1994
20106 Morton August 20, 1995
29348 Criswick March 28, 1995
39791 Jameshesser August 13, 1997
48774 Anngower August 10, 1997
54411 Bobestelle[1] June 3, 2000
60622 Pritchet March 30, 2000
81915 Hartwick July 15, 2000
100416 Syang February 2, 1996
100596 Perrett August 9, 1997
150145 Uvic January 23, 1996
154660 Kavelaars March 29, 2004
157194 Saddlemyer August 21, 2004
168358 Casca February 24, 1996
197856 Tafelmusik August 21, 2004
202740 Vicsympho June 11, 2007
(217670) 1998 UQ6 October 22, 1998
241090 Nemet October 23, 2006
246238 Crampton September 5, 2007
255703 Stetson August 25, 2006
(256550) 2007 LV14 June 11, 2007
(262002) 2006 QE57 August 23, 2006
273987 Greggwade June 11, 2007
288478 Fahlman March 16, 2004
289314 Chisholm September 30, 2003
292051 Bohlender September 14, 2006
293878 Tapping September 30, 2003
304233 Majaess September 14, 2006
308825 Siksika September 14, 2006
314988 Sireland December 13, 2006
315012 Hutchings January 20, 2007
315186 Schade June 11, 2007
325973 Cardinal December 13, 2006
332324 Bobmcdonald December 12, 2006
(345842) 2007 LG31 June 12, 2007
(350185) 2011 UA260 June 3, 2006
(352102) 2007 AG12 January 13, 2007
(353349) 2010 VT103 September 9, 2007
(356450) 2010 XF85 June 11, 2007
358376 Gwyn December 13, 2006
(359945) 2012 AR8 June 12, 2007
(362793) 2011 WQ140 August 23, 2006
378204 Bettyhesser December 26, 2006
380480 Glennhawley December 16, 2003
381260 Ouellette October 11, 2007
(383417) 2006 UY216 October 23, 2006
(402920) 2007 TH142 October 7, 2007
(414026) 2007 LX29 June 11, 2007
  1. 1 with P. B. Stetson

David D. Balam is a Canadian astronomer and a research associate with University of Victoria's Department of Physics and Astronomy, in Victoria, British Columbia. Specializing in the search for Near-Earth objects, Balam is one of the world's most prolific contributors to this research;[1] only two astronomers have made more such discoveries than Balam.[2] He is credited with the discovery or co-discovery of more than 600 asteroids, over a thousand extra-galactic supernovae,[2] and novae in the galaxy M31.[citation needed] Balam is also co-credited for the 1997 discovery of Comet Zhu-Balam.[3][4]

Among celestial bodies discovered by Balam are the asteroid 150145 Uvic, which he named for the University of Victoria,[2] and 197856 Tafelmusik, named for the Baroque orchestra in Toronto.[5] The asteroid 3749 Balam is named in his honour, recognizing the fact that he developed most of the software for the university's astrometric program on minor planets and comets.[6] Currently, Balam conducts an optical transient survey (OTS) using the 1.82-m Plaskett Telescope of the National Research Council of Canada.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dickinson, Terence (May 10, 1998). "B.C. telescope a key anti-asteroid sentry". Toronto Star. 
  2. ^ a b c "t's a bird, it's a plane -- wait, no, it's UVic hurtling through the sky". canada.com/Victoria Times Colonist. June 1, 2007. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  3. ^ "New comet named after astronomers". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. November 13, 1998. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  4. ^ McNeney, Mike (February 6, 1998). "Sharp-eyed Balam co-discovers comet". The Ring/University of Victoria. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  5. ^ "Asteroid has Tafelmusik's name on it". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. April 17, 2009. Retrieved 1 February 2010. 
  6. ^ "Minor Planets and Comets". Minor Planet Circular (International Astronomical Union) 13 (105): page 74. May 31, 1988. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 

External links[edit]