David Nobbs

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David Nobbs
Born (1935-03-13) 13 March 1935 (age 79)
Petts Wood, Kent, England

David Gordon Nobbs (born 13 March 1935 in Petts Wood, Kent)[1] is an English comedy writer.

Life and career[edit]

Following an education at Marlborough College and Cambridge University, Nobbs wrote for many of Britain's comedy performers over the years, including Kenneth Williams, Frankie Howerd, Les Dawson and The Two Ronnies. He is also the creator of the successful 1970s sitcom The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (adapted from his own Reginald Perrin novels), the 1989 comedy/drama series A Bit of a Do and the highly-acclaimed Henry Pratt series of novels, the fourth of which, Pratt à Manger, was published in 2006. His novel, It Had to be You was published in 2011.

On 15 September 2010, Nobbs, along with 54 other public figures, signed an open letter published in The Guardian, stating their opposition to Pope Benedict XVI's state visit to the UK.[2]

Novels[edit]

  • The Itinerant Lodger (1965)
  • Ostrich Country (1968)
  • A Piece of the Sky is Missing (1969)
  • The Death of Reginald Perrin (1975, later reissued as The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin)
  • The Return of Reginald Perrin (1977)
  • The Better World of Reginald Perrin (1978)
  • Second From Last in the Sack Race (1983)
  • A Bit of a Do (1986)
  • Pratt of the Argus (1988)
  • Fair Do's (1990)
  • The Cucumber Man (1994)
  • The Legacy of Reginald Perrin (1996)
  • Going Gently (2000)
  • Sex and Other Changes (2004)
  • Pratt à Manger (2006)
  • Cupid's Dart (2008)
  • Obstacles to Young Love (2010)
  • It Had to be You (2011)
  • The Fall and Rise of Gordon Coppinger (2012)

Television works[edit]

Radio works[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

  • I Didn't Get Where I Am Today (autobiography, 2001)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nevin, Charles (2005-11-19). "When you're smiling". The Guardian. Retrieved 2007-08-12. 
  2. ^ "Letters: Harsh judgments on the pope and religion". The Guardian (London). 15 September 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 

External links[edit]