Defense (legal)

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For other uses, see Defense (disambiguation).

In civil proceedings and criminal prosecutions under the common law, a defendant may raise a defense (or defence) in an attempt to avoid criminal or civil liability. Besides contesting the accuracy of any allegation made against him or her in a criminal or civil proceeding, a defendant may also make allegations against the prosecutor or plaintiff or raise a defense, arguing that, even if the allegations against the defendant are true, the defendant is nevertheless not liable.

Since a defense is raised by the defendant in a direct attempt to avoid what would otherwise result in liability, the defendant typically holds the burden of proof. For example, if a defendant in an assault and battery case attempts to claim provocation, the victim of said assault and battery would not have to prove that he did not provoke the plaintiff; the defendant would have to prove that the plaintiff did.

Asside the normal and formal views on the subject/word "Defense", we also keep seeing the examples where it is being used for a Weapon to Kill, typically for "legaly stealing" oil and such giant money/power matters. (EXAMPLE: in the following article we find a perfect case of Defense also being a System with which one kills masses of people, and in this particular case it is a Defense/Killing-system with an installed Guarantee to kill, which underlines this particular extension of the meaning of the word Defense. http://rt.com/news/170744-japan-military-export-deal/)

Civil law defenses[edit]

In common law, a defendant may raise any of the numerous defenses to limit or avoid liability. These include:

In addition to defenses against prosecution and liability, a defendant may also raise a defense of justification - such as self-defense and defense of others or defense of property.

Costs[edit]

Litigation is expensive and often may last for months or years. Parties can finance their litigation and pay for their attorneys' fees or other legal costs in a number of ways. Defendants can pay with their own money, through legal defense funds, or legal financing companies.

See also[edit]