Dirección Federal de Seguridad

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The Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Federal Security Directorate, DFS) was a Mexican intelligence agency. Created in 1947 under Miguel Alemán Valdés with "the duty of preserving the internal stability of Mexico against all forms subversion and terrorist threats",[1] it was merged into the Centro de Investigación y Seguridad Nacional (CISEN) in 1985 after the murder of the U.S. agent Enrique Camarena Salazar.[2]

According to Peter Dale Scott, the DFS was in part a CIA creation, and "the CIA's closest government allies were for years in the DFS". DFS badges, "handed out to top-level Mexican drug-traffickers, have been labelled by DEA agents a virtual 'license to traffic.'"[3] Scott also said, "The Guadalajara Cartel, Mexico's most powerful drug-trafficking network in the early 1980s, prospered largely because it enjoyed the protection of the DFS, under its chief Miguel Nazar Haro, a CIA asset."[3]

Mexican journalist Manuel Buendía Tellezgirón was murdered by members of the DFS for reporting on Mexican high-ranking officials corruption, and their relation with the CIA and Drug Trafficking.

Heads[edit]

  • Marcelino Inurreta de la Fuente (1947-1952).
  • Leandro Castillo Venegas (1952-1958).
  • Gilberto Suárez Torres (1958-1959).
  • Manuel Rangel Escamilla (1959-1964).
  • Fernando Gutierrez Barrios (1965-1970).
  • Luis de la Barrera Moreno (1970-197).
  • Javier García Paniagua (1977-1978).
  • Miguel Nazar Haro (1978-1982).
  • José Antonio Zorrilla Pérez (1982-1985).
  • Pablo González Ruelas (1985).[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Mexico) Security Reports, Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, University of Texas Libraries, the University of Texas at Austin, Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Mexico) Security Reports, 1970-1977
  2. ^ Jones, Nathan (28 July 2012). "Mexico, drugs and a possible way forward". The Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 28 July 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Peter Dale Scott (2000), Washington and the politics of drugs, Variant, 2(11)
  4. ^ Aguayo Quezada, Sergio (2001). La Charola. Grijalbo. p. 413. ISBN 970-05-1389-0.