Humvee manufacturing in China

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A Dongfeng (Eastwind) EQ2050 at the China People's Revolution Military Museum during the "Our troops towards the sun" exhibition.

There are at least three Chinese automobile manufacturers building Humvee copies. Two of the Humvee copies rely heavily on copied U.S.-made parts including chassis, gear box, and diesel engine in the past.[1] Currently, these companies have the capability of making indigenous parts for these Humvee-like vehicles.[2]

Variants[edit]

Dong Feng EQ2050[edit]

During the 1988 Beijing Defence Exhibition, AM General presented a M998 4x4 to the People's Liberation Army.[3] The PLA didn't show much interest to the vehicle before the events of Operation Desert Storm, which made them interested in studying the vehicle.[3] The Chinese petroleum industry purchased Hummers through American commercial sources in the mid-1990s.[3] This provided the Chinese auto makers with an opportunity to examine the vehicle closely and provided an opportunity for reverse engineering.[4] Later in 2003, the EQ2050 made its debut in a car show after a prototype was made in 2002.[3] The vehicle became the preferred candidate in 2004 with 57 vehicles sent to the PLA for trials from 2004 to 2006.[5] The first 100 EQ2050s were made with American-made parts.[4] It passed design trials in 2006.[5] EQ2050s were then delivered to PLA special forces unit in the Guangzhou Military Region.[2] It's known as Mengshi in Chinese.[1]

The EQ2050 is based on an imported AM General Hummer H1 chassis.[1] The DFM EQ2050 is powered by a Dongfeng license-built Cummins EQB150-20 110 kW/2,700R turbo-charged diesel, but it can also be fitted with the U.S.-made V8 diesel originally designed for Humvee.[1][4] Both vehicles have a 5-speed gear box and a 2-speed transfer box.[6] They are both four-wheel drive with independent suspensions and central inflating system. The EQ2050 also has re-designed lights and radiator to make it look different from the original Humvee. DFM has cooperated with AM General Motors on getting American-made parts for the first EQ2050s made.[2]

A variant of the EQ2050 called the EQ2058 was made for military purposes, which has an armored body.[3] A civilian version of the EQ2050 is being made by DFM, which will use petrol engines instead of diesel engines.[7]

While the EQ2050 was adopted by the PLA, it was also adopted by People's Armed Police Fire Fighting brigades[8] and by Chinese Public Security Police forces.[9][4] It is called the Hanma, an approximation of the Chinese pronunciation of Hummer.

Shenyang Aircraft Corporation SFQ2040[edit]

In 2002, Shenyang Aircraft Corporation (SAC) revealed its own Humvee clone known as SFQ2040 LieYing (Falcon).[3][5][10] The missile system, mounted on an SAC SFQ2040, is similar to the U.S. Army HMMWV-mounted Avenger air defense system.[11] SAC also emphasizes the low cost of its SFQ2040 with the price being one-third of the U.S.-made Humvee.[12] A few working prototypes were made from 2002 to 2003.[12]

Unlike the steel body EQ2050, the SAC SFQ2040 has an aluminum alloy body, making it much lighter than the former.[12] It uses a Cummins 4BTAA-92 turbodiesel engine.[12] SAC lost out to DFM, which resulted in an attempt to create a civilian version of the SFQ2040, but it never went into production.[12] Both vehicles have limited armor protection against small caliber weapons. The vehicles can be fitted with additional equipment such as air conditioning, GPS, night vision equipment, vehicle-mounted radio, electric winch, and multipurpose weapon mount.

Xiaolong XL2060[edit]

A third Humvee clone is the XL2060L Fierce Dragon from Xiaolong Automotive Technologies Co., Ltd.[13][14] XAT publicly rolled out the vehicles from its production lines on October 2008.[15] Trials are being conducted by the PLA in remote areas such as Tibet.[2][16]

The XL2060 was influenced from the Humvee and the Unimog.[15] A civilian version is currently being made by XAT.[2]

Operators[edit]

  •  Pakistan- 20,000+ are planned to be acquired by Pakistan Army and to be Manufactured locally at Heavy Industries Taxila (HIT)
  •  Belarus - 22 Dongfeng EQ2058s donated for use by Belarusian special forces units.[17][18] Delivered under an act of gratuitous transfer of military assistance signed by Belarus and China on June 19, 2012 and have made public appearances on its independence day parade.[19]
  •  China - Dongfeng EQ2050s in service with the People's Liberation Army.[20] Also in use by People's Armed Police Fire Fighting brigades[8] and by Public Security Police forces.[9][4]

Potential operators[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Hummer-Inspired Chinese Trucks (1): Dongfeng “Hanma” (EQ-2050, 2058)". China Auto Web. November 14, 2010. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "中国的高机动多用途轮式车辆(HMMWV)" (in English and Mandarin). November 2, 2005. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "EQ2050 1.5t High Mobility Utility Vehicle". Sino Defence. March 22, 2007. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Tycho de Feyter (June 2, 2011). "A black Dongfeng ‘Hummer’ police car in China". Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "EQ2050 Light Utility Vehicle". Sino Defence. February 13, 2009. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Dongfeng EQ-2050, 2058 Features". China Auto Web. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  7. ^ Tycho de Feyter (June 2, 2011). "Dongfeng working on a Hummer for the People". Car News China. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Tycho de Feyter (August 19, 2011). "Dongfeng ‘Hummer’ Fire Bigade edition from China". Car News China. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Tycho de Feijter (April 17, 2011). "Dongfeng ‘Hummer’ police version for Shanghai". Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Mengshi EQ2050" (in English and French). Maquetland. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. 
  11. ^ James Dunnigan (May 18, 2005). "China Clones the American Avenger". Strategy Page. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c d e Tycho de Feijter (June 2, 2011). "SAC Falcon, the other ‘Hummer’ from China". Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Xiaolong XL2060L - the civilian version hits the market? | Autochiny". Autochiny.pl. February 5, 2012. Archived from the original on May 7, 2012. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Keep the Children at Home: a civilian Xiaolong XL2060L from China | CarNewsChina.com - China Auto News". CarNewsChina.com. February 4, 2012. Archived from the original on February 23, 2013. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  15. ^ a b "Hummer-Inspired Chinese Trucks (2): Xiao Long XL2060L". China Auto Web. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  16. ^ http://en.xiaolongauto.com/Company.html
  17. ^ James Dunnigan (July 12, 2012). "The Great Chinese Hummer Give-Away". Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  18. ^ "China donates 22 off-roaders to Belarusian Army". Belarusian Telegraph Agency. June 20, 2012. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  19. ^ "China to provide the Defense Ministry of Belarus 22 armored vehicles". The China Times. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. 
  20. ^ "EQ2050 Light Utility Vehicle". Sino Defence. February 13, 2009. Archived from the original on October 27, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  21. ^ "EQ2050". Archived from the original on April 23, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  22. ^ Oscar Nkala (November 29, 2012). "Namibia evaluating Chinese Humvee clone - reports". Defence Web. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 

External links[edit]