Eastern Flying Training Command

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Eastern Flying Training Command
Eastern Flying Training Command-Map.png
Locations of airfields controlled by the Eastern Flying Training Command
Active 1940-1945
Country  United States
Branch US Army Air Corps Hap Arnold Wings.svg  United States Army Air Forces
Type Command and Control
Role Training
Part of Army Air Forces Training Command
Engagements

World War II

  • World War II - American Campaign Streamer (Plain).png
    World War II American Theater
Insignia
Eastern Flying Training Command emblem Eastern flying training command emblem.png

Eastern Flying Training Command is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was assigned to the Army Air Forces Training Command, stationed at Maxwell Field, Alabama. It was inactivated on 15 December 1945.

History[edit]

The Eastern Flying Training Command (EFTC) was established on 8 July 1940 by the Office of the Chief of Air Corps as part of the expansion of the training department of the Air Corps. After the Fall of France in May 1940, the United States began rapidly expanding its military forces, and with the large numbers of men entering the military, the training requirements of the Air Corps were drastically expanded.[1]

As a result, the centralized training of aircrew was divided into three Training Centers, the Eastern, Gulf Coast (later Central) and Western. Training schools were assigned to the Centers based on the geography of the United States. In July 1943, these Centers were re-designated as Eastern, Central and Western Training Commands.[1]

By 1944, EFTC controlled a large number of training schools in the Southwestern United States, and established several Wings to provide organizational command and control over them, based on both training types and geography. The schools operated by EFTC part of the Aviation Cadet Training Program. These were:[1]

  • Classification: This was the stage where it would be decided whether the cadet would train as a navigator, bombardier, or pilot
  • Preflight: Ground training for all air cadets. Successful completion meant being assigned to a flying school for training. "Washouts" were returned to the regular Air Corps ranks for re-assignment.
  • Primary (Phase I): Taught basic flying using two-seater training aircraft. Usually taught by contract flying schools operated by the WFTC
  • Basic (Phase II): Formation flying, air navigation, cross-country flying skills were taught.
  • Advanced (Phase II): Single or multi-engine aircraft schools for cadets becoming fighter, bomber or transport pilots. After graduation, the successful Air Cadet received his "wings" and were commissioned Second Lieutenants. In addition, experienced pilots in the field were sent to Training Command "transition schools" to acquire additional single or mulch-engine flying ratings.

In addition to the American Air Cadets, Cadets from the British Royal Air Force and Free French Air Force were trained in flying skills. EFTC also operated aircrew schools for Navigators, Bombardiers and flexible aerial gunners. Radio operators were centrally trained at Scott Field, Illinois. Other aircrew positions, such as B-29 flight engineers and RADAR operators were also trained later in the war as training requirements presented themselves. This included the first jet pilots in 1945.[1]

EFTC was inactivated on 15 December 1945, being consolidated into the new Central Flying Training Command at Randolph Field, Texas, as part of the consolidation of the Army Air Forces after World War II ended.[1]

Lineage[edit]

  • Established as Southeast Air Corps Training Center on 8 July 1940 and activated
Re-designated Army Air Forces East Coast Training Center on 29 October 1942
Re-designated Eastern Flying Training Command on 31 July 1943
Inactivated on 15 December 1945[1]

Assignments[edit]

  • Office of the Chief of Air Corps, 8 July 1940
  • Air Corps Flying Training Command (later Army Air Forces Flying Training Command, Army Air Forces Training Command), 23 January 1942 - 15 December 1945[1]

Stations[edit]

  • Maxwell Field, Alabama, 8 July 1940 – 15 December 1945[1]

Major Components[edit]

Major Aircraft[edit]

Primary flight training
Boeing-Stearman PT-17, Fairchild PT-19 and Ryan PT-22 twin-seat, single engine trainers[1]
Basic flight training
Vultee BT-13 and Vultee BT-15[1]
Advanced flight training
North American AT-6 (single engine); Cessna AT-17 (two-engine)[1]
Specialized schools:
Curtiss-Wright AT-9s were used for high performance two-engine training in perpetration for Lockheed P-38 Lightning training
Beechcraft AT-10s were used for pilots in training for two engine bombers (B-25s and B-26s)
Beechcraft AT-11s were used for pilots in training for C-47 transports along with bombardier training
Beechcraft AT-7s were used for two-engine pilot training and also navigator training
Boeing B-17s and Consolidated B-24s were used for four-engine pilot training
L-2, L-3, L-4, TG-5 and TG-6s were used for glider and liaison pilot training
Gunnery training schools flew A-33, AT-6s, AT-1s, B-34s, B-10s and RP-63s for air-to-air flexible gunnery training.[1]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Manning, Thomas A. (2005), History of Air Education and Training Command, 1942–2002. Office of History and Research, Headquarters, AETC, Randolph AFB, Texas ASIN: B000NYX3PC
  2. ^ 27th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  3. ^ 28th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  4. ^ 29th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  5. ^ 30th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  6. ^ 74th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  7. ^ 75th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  8. ^ 7[th Flying Training Wing, lineage and history document Air Force Historical Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama

External links[edit]