Eddy Hartenstein

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Eddy Hartenstein
Residence Southern California
Alma mater Cal Poly Pomona (B.S. aerospace engineering and mathematics);[1] Caltech (M.S.)
Occupation Publisher and CEO of Los Angeles Times
Chairman of the Board of Sirius XM Radio
Website
Eddy Hartenstein

Eddy W. Hartenstein is an American media executive currently serving as publisher and CEO of the Los Angeles Times. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Broadcom Corporation, City of Hope National Medical Center, SanDisk, and Sirius XM Radio where he serves as non-executive chairman.[2]

Hartenstein was named publisher and chief executive officer of the Los Angeles Times in August, 2008.[2] He was named president and chief executive officer of the Tribune Company in May, 2011, while retaining his roles at the L.A. Times.[3] When Tribune emerged from bankruptcy in January 2013, Peter Liguori replaced Hartenstein as Tribune's president and CEO.[4]

Tribune Company[edit]

Eddy W. Hartenstein was President and CEO of Tribune Company from May, 2011 to January 2013. Hartenstein was named publisher & chief executive officer of the Los Angeles Times in August, 2008 and continues to serve in these roles. Since that time, he has overseen all aspects of the print and digital operations of the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the U.S.[5]

Pre-Tribune Company[edit]

Previously, Hartenstein was involved in the satellite television business. As the first executive of DirecTV, Hartenstein served as the company’s chairman and CEO, and was responsible for strategic planning.

Hartenstein earned Bachelor of Science degrees in aerospace engineering and mathematics from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona).[1] He then joined Hughes Aircraft in 1972, and in 1974, earned a Master of Science degree from Caltech. By 1981, Hartenstein had become vice president of Hughes Communications, where he was responsible for expanding Hughes’ acquisition and deployment of commercial communications satellites and directed the development and marketing of the original Galaxy satellite fleet.

In 1990, Hartenstein was named president of the new Hughes-owned subsidiary to develop direct-to-home satellite TV service. Hartenstein organized the new business, and formed DirecTV.

Under Hartenstein’s direction, DirecTV began commercial service in 1994. He served as DirecTV chairman and CEO from inception to 2004.

During his tenure, Hartenstein also led the regulatory push to change U.S. law to allow local broadcast stations to be rebroadcast into their markets over direct broadcast satellite and, through DirecTV, led the industry into digital television. Hartenstein retired as vice chairman of the DirecTV Group after the company’s sale to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. in December 2004.[5]

Early life[edit]

Born in Alhambra, California, like many students of the era, Hartenstein's interest in technology and aerospace/technology were sparked by the space race. Hartenstein earned Bachelor of Science degrees in aerospace engineering and mathematics from Cal Poly Pomona . He then joined Hughes Aircraft in 1972, and in 1974, earned a Master of Science degree in applied mechanics from Caltech.[2]

Recognition[edit]

Hartenstein was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Class of 2001 and into the Broadcasting & Cable Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2007, Hartenstein received an Emmy from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for lifetime achievement, and was inducted into the Consumer Electronics Association Hall of Fame in 2008.[5]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Engineering Distinguished Alum: Eddy Hartenstein". Cal Poly Pomona College of Engineering. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  2. ^ a b c "Eddy W. Hartenstein". Latimes.com. Retrieved 2011-01-31. 
  3. ^ Szalai, Georg (6 May 2011). "Tribune Names Eddy Hartenstein President and CEO". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 11 July 2011. 
  4. ^ "Eddy W. Hartenstein". LATimes.com. 
  5. ^ a b c "Eddy W. Hartenstein". tribune.com. Retrieved 2011-02-18.