Frank Kimbrough (American football)

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Frank Kimbrough
Frank Kimbrough.png
Kimbrough pictured in The Bronco 1936, Hardin–Simmons yearbook
Sport(s) Football, basketball
Biographical details
Born (1904-06-24)June 24, 1904
Died February 4, 1971(1971-02-04) (aged 66)
Playing career
Football
1922–1925

Hardin–Simmons
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1935–1940
1941–1942
1943
1945–1946
1947–1957

Basketball
1936–1941

Hardin–Simmons
Baylor
North Carolina Pre-Flight
Baylor
West Texas State


Hardin–Simmons
Head coaching record
Overall 118–87–9 (football)
29–50 (basketball)
Bowls 2–0
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 Border (1950)

Frank H. Kimbrough (June 24, 1904 – February 4, 1971) was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Hardin–Simmons University (1935–1940), Baylor University (1941–1942, 1945–1946), and West Texas State University—now West Texas A&M University (1947–1957). Kimbrough was also the head basketball coach at Hardin–Simmons from 1936 to 1941, tallying a mark of 29–50. He was the brother of former Texas A&M star football player John Kimbrough.

Kimbrough began his college coaching career at Hardin–Simmons in 1935. After finishing the 1940 season with a perfect 9–0 record, Kimbrough—at age 37—was hired by Baylor, replacing Morley Jennings. With mediocre results in his first three seasons, Kimbrough resigned after Baylor went 1–8 in 1946. In the middle of his Baylor tenure, Kimbrough served as the head coach for the North Carolina Pre-Flight School team in 1943 and led the Cloudbusters to an overall record of 2–4–1.[1] He was immediately hired by West Texas A&M, where he coached the following 11 years. In 1950 his team went 10–1, including a Sun Bowl win over Cincinnati. Kimbrough retired in 1957 to become the school's athletic director. Kimbrough Memorial Stadium in Canyon, Texas, the West Texas A&M's football field, is named in his honor.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Hardin–Simmons Cowboys (Independent) (1935–1940)
1935 Hardin–Simmons 6–3–1
1936 Hardin–Simmons 9–2
1937 Hardin–Simmons 8–0–1
1938 Hardin–Simmons 8–2
1939 Hardin–Simmons 7–1–1
1940 Hardin–Simmons 9–0
Hardin–Simmons: 47–8–3
Baylor Bears (Southwest Conference) (1941–1942)
1941 Baylor 3–6–1 1–4–1 6th
1942 Baylor 6–4–1 3–2–1 4th
North Carolina Pre-Flight Cloudbusters (Independent) (1943)
1943 North Carolina Pre-Flight 2–4–1
North Carolina Pre-Flight: 2–4–1
Baylor Bears (Southwest Conference) (1945–1946)
1945 Baylor 5–5–1 2–4 6th
1946 Baylor 1–8 0–6 7th
Baylor: 15–23–3 6–16–2
West Texas State Buffaloes (Border Conference) (1947–1957)
1947 West Texas State 7–4 5–2 3rd
1948 West Texas State 6–5 2–3 6th
1949 West Texas State 5–4 3–2 5th
1950 West Texas State 10–1 6–0 1st W Sun
1951 West Texas State 2–7 1–5 T–7th
1952 West Texas State 3–6 1–4 7th
1953 West Texas State 1–8–1 0–6 7th
1954 West Texas State 1–8 1–5 7th
1955 West Texas State 4–4–1 1–4–1 6th
1956 West Texas State 8–2 2–2 3rd W Tangerine
1957 West Texas State 7–3 3–1 2nd
West Texas State: 54–52–2 25–34–1
Total: 118–87–9
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jones, Wilbur D. (2009). "Football! Navy! War!": How Military "Lend-Lease" Players Saved the College Game and Helped Win World War II. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company. pp. 124–126. ISBN 978-0-7864-4219-5. Retrieved January 16, 2012. 

External links[edit]