Gabriel Green

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Gabriel Green
Born (1924-11-11)November 11, 1924
Whittier, California
Died September 8, 2001(2001-09-08) (aged 76)
Yucca Valley, California

Gabriel Green (born November 11, 1924, in Whittier, California, died September 8, 2001, in Yucca Valley, California) was an early UFOlogist who claimed contact with extraterrestrials. Green was a write-in United States presidential candidate in 1960 and 1972.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Green claimed to have graduated with a PhD in physics from UC Berkeley in 1953, and to have made several important contributions to the Standard Model of elementary particles, but his actual educational background seems to have been acquired at Woodbury Business College in Los Angeles. For much of his life he worked as a photographer for the Los Angeles school system. He is probably also among the least well-known of the classic 1950s contactees, individuals who claimed to have met and talked with friendly human-looking Space Brothers from other planets, and to have ridden in their spacecraft.

He founded the California-based Amalgamated Flying Saucer Clubs of America, Inc. in 1957, approximately at the same time he announced his meeting with flying saucer crewmen from the hitherto unknown planet Korender, orbiting the triple star Alpha Centauri. Like George Adamski and most other contactees of the period, he said he was able to maintain continual telepathic links with the wise and helpful extraterrestrials he had met. In his 1960 run for US president, he claimed to represent the Universal Flying Saucer Party, and to base his political philosophy on "United World Universal Economics." He also ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate in 1962 in California, claiming to have accumulated over 171,000 votes.

In 1967 he published his only book, Let's Face Facts about Flying Saucers. In 1972 he ran again, this time in Iowa, for US president, collecting less than 200 votes. Like most if not all of the 1950s contactees, Green was evidently far more interested in New Age/Theosophical topics such as reincarnation, channelling, Spiritualism and psychic phenomena than he was in being a prophet expounding wisdom supposedly acquired from friendly space-alien contacts. Also—like most of the more obscure contactees—he eventually dropped out of sight, moving to the vicinity of Yucca Valley, California after his last run for president, and very seldom thereafter appearing in public until his death about three decades later.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harnisch, Larry (August 8, 2010). "The Daily Mirror - Larry Harnisch reflects on Los Angeles history". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 30 October 2013. 
  2. ^ James R. Lewis (1 November 2003). Encyclopedic sourcebook of UFO religions. Prometheus Books. ISBN 978-1-57392-964-6. 

External links[edit]