Transformers: Generation 1

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This article is about the first Transformers series. For the toy line in general, see Transformers (toy line).
Transformers: Generation 1
TransformersG1Logo.jpg
Type Action figure
Company Takara-Tomy / Hasbro
Country United States
Availability 1984–1991
Official website

Transformers: Generation 1 (also known as Generation One or G1) was a children's toy line that ran from 1984 to 1991 and was produced by Hasbro.[1] It was a line of toy robots that could change into an alternate form (vehicles such as cars and planes, miniature guns or cassettes, monsters, and even dinosaurs) by moving parts into other places, and it was the first line of toys produced for the successful Transformers toy and entertainment franchise. The line was originally called The Transformers, with "Generation 1" originating as a term coined by fans of the toys when the Transformers: Generation 2 toy line was released in 1992. Hasbro eventually adopted the term "Generation 1" to refer to any toy produced in that era.

Overview[edit]

In 1983, Hasbro representatives were sent to Tokyo Toy Show, a toy expo in Japan, in search of prospective toys that they could import to the North American market. At the time, Japanese toy manufacturer Takara was showcasing several transforming robot toys from lines such as Diaclone, Micro Change and Mecha. Hasbro bought the rights to produce the toys, but decided to release them under a single brand to avoid confusing the market with several series with similar premises.

Prior to the Hasbro deal, Takara briefly sold Diaclone toys in specialty toy shops in the U.S. under the "Diakron" moniker, while in some parts of Europe, Diaclone enjoyed a small following with a comic book series for that market.

Hasbro had a business relationship with Marvel Comics, which had successfully produced the Hasbro tie-in comic book G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, based on the Hasbro action figure. Marvel was approached once again to provide a backstory for the new toy line. Marvel editor-in-chief Jim Shooter and writer Dennis O'Neil created an overall story, and editor Bob Budiansky was brought in to create names and profiles for the characters.

When the toy line was released, it was supported by the Marvel Comics series, an animated television series, and a gamut of other merchandising tie-ins. In 1986 a feature film was released, generating $5,706,456 in the United States.[2]

Premise[edit]

The setup for Transformers are two factions of sentient alien robots: the heroic Autobots and the evil Decepticons. Both sides are from a race called Transformers - robots that can change into vehicles, mechanical devices and even animal forms. They have waged civil war for eons on their home planet of Cybertron, a war that had started several million years B.C., before humans even existed on Earth. Their planet of Cybertron had become decimated and both factions have been reduced to scavenging for needed supplies, primarily energy. The Autobots leave their planet on a space ship, and the Decepticons follow them in their own vessel. When the Decepticons board the Autobot ship, a battle breaks out, and with nobody controlling the ship it crashes onto prehistoric Earth and knocks everyone unconscious. Millions of years later, in 1984, the dormant volcano the Autobot ship had crashed on becomes active. The eruption re-sets the ship's computer, which deploys a probe to study the planet. The computer learns that the planet is inhabited, and in order to survive first contact the computer both repairs the disabled Transformers and re-configures them with physical forms based on vehicles and machines of human origin. The Transformers are now able to hide by changing into vehicles or devices in case humans turn out to be hostile.

This initial premise, in all three media (toys, TV series and comics), became more cosmic in scale as time passed. More stories began to be set in outer space and on alien worlds, especially after The Transformers: The Movie.

Additional story elements are also added to the series, such as establishing the origins of the Transformers race. A cruel and coldly logical race of alien squid-like creatures with five faces and tentacles known as Quintessons originally built mundane robots. There were two primary product lines; one producing construction and service robots while the other produced military robots, which were the respective progenitors of the Autobots and Decepticons. They also created a gigantic factory that would become so large as to be an artificial planet in its own right, Cybertron. Eventually the design of the robots would become so sophisticated they accidentally developed emotions, self-awareness, and the machines went into rebellion, known as the 1st Cybertronian War. After successfully seizing control of Cyberton the robots lived in peace until the Decepticons could not resist or overcome their innate desire for military campaign and attempted a coup. The Autobots only overcame the Decepticons in the 2nd Cybertronian war by developing transformation to hide as mundane objects, vehicles, or tools. After copying the transformation ability of Autobots and creating a new leader named Megatron, the Decepticons launched into a 3rd Cybertronian war that would see Cybertron ruined, at which point the TV series begins.

Two characters - each the greatest leader of his side, became the most iconic representatives of the series: Optimus Prime of the Autobots and Megatron of the Decepticons. After the featured film, Megatron was reformed as Galvatron, and Optimus Prime was replaced for a time by Rodimus Prime, only to return later on. Both Optimus Prime and Megatron continued to appear in one form or another in subsequent Transformers series, where they maintained their leadership roles.

Line history[edit]

The toys of Generation 1 are divided into seven different series determined by the year in which they were originally released.[3]

Series 1[edit]

The first ever series of Transformers toys features twenty-eight characters in all; eighteen Autobots and ten Decepticons. Of these, eleven of the Autobots transform into cars, six of the Autobots transform into minicars, and one of the Autobots transforms into a tractor trailer truck, while three of the Decepticons transform into planes, five of the Decepticons transform into microcassettes, one of the Decepticons transforms into a microcassette recorder, and one of the Decepticons transforms into a gun.[4] The toys are branded as follows:

Optimus Prime is the Autobot Commander and transforms into a tractor trailer truck, specifically a Freightliner COE 1980. The toy consists of three separate parts while in its robot form; the main figure, which transforms from the cabin of the truck, an Autobot Headquarters, which transforms from the tractor trailer, serves as a combat deck, and includes a mechanic/artillery robot, and a small scout car named Roller, which launches from the Autobot Headquarters.[5]

The eleven Autobot cars consist of Bluestreak, Hound, Ironhide, Jazz, Mirage, Prowl, Ratchet, Sideswipe, Sunstreaker, Trailbreaker, and Wheeljack.[6] Bluestreak, the gunner, transforms into a Datsun Fairlady 280ZX;[7] Hound, the scout, transforms into a Mitsubishi J59 Jeep;[8] Ironhide, who serves as security, transforms into a 1980 Nissan Onebox Cherry Vanette;[9] Jazz, the special operations expert, transforms into a 1981 Porsche 935 Turbo;[9] Mirage, the spy, transforms into a Ligier JS11 Formula 1 Racer;[10] Prowl, the military strategist, transforms into a Datsun Fairlady 280ZX Police Cruiser;[11] Ratchet, the medic, transforms into a Nissan Onebox Ambulance Vanette;[12] Sideswipe, a warrior, transforms into a Lamborghini Countach prototype crafted from the LP400 and LP400S models;[13] Sunstreaker, who is Sideswipe's twin brother, and is also a warrior, transforms into a Lamborghini Countach LP500S;[14] Trailbreaker, the defense strategist, transforms into a Toyota Hi-Lux 4WD;[15] and Wheeljack, the mechanical engineer, transforms into a Lancia Stratos Turbo #539 "Alitallia".[16]

The six Autobot minicars consist of Brawn, Bumblebee, Cliffjumper, Gears, Huffer, and Windcharger.[17] Brawn, who serves in demolitions, transforms into a Land Rover Defender 4x4;[18] Bumblebee, who serves in espionage, transforms into a Classic Volkswagen Beetle;[18] Cliffjumper, a warrior, transforms into a Porsche Turbo 924;[19] Gears, who serves as a transport and in reconnaissance, transforms into a 4WD off road truck;[19] Huffer, the construction engineer, transforms into the cabin of a semi truck;[20] and Windcharger, a warrior, transforms into a Pontiac Firebird Trans Am.[20]

Megatron is the Decepticon Leader and can transform into three different types of guns; a Walther P38 handgun, a particle beam cannon, and a telescopic laser cannon.[21]

Soundwave is the Decepticon Communicator and transforms into a microcassette recorder modeled after a 1980s Sony Walkman.[22] The five Decepticon microcassettes are Buzzsaw, Frenzy, Lazerbeak, Ravage, and Rumble.[23][24] Buzzsaw, the spy, resembles a condor while in robot form, and came packaged with Soundwave.[24] Lazerbeak, who serves in interrogation, also resembles a condor while in robot form, and was sold with Frenzy, who is a warrior.[25] Ravage, the saboteur, resembles a jaguar while in robot form, and was sold with Rumble, who serves in demolitions.[26]

The three Decepticon planes are Skywarp, Starscream, and Thundercracker. All three of them transform into F-15 Eagles. Skywarp and Thundercracker are both warriors, while Starscream is the Aerospace Commander.[27]

Series 2[edit]

"Can you find the black square label on your Transformer? Rub the label-Watch the robot face appear! It is your evidence that this robot is a true Transformer!"

Operating explanation for the heat sensitive rub signs, as found in the instruction booklets for toys that were new to Series 2, and in brochures that were included with the reissued Series 1 toys[28]

Series 2 features reissued versions of all of the toys from Series 1 and also introduced seventy-six new toys.[29][30] Although in a broad sense, forty-three of these new toys are Autobots, and thirty-one of them are Decepticons, the branding for the toy line became much more specific during this series, as various subgroups began to be introduced. As such, only thirty-five of these new toys are standard Autobots and only eighteen of them are standard Decepticons. Of the other new toys, five are branded as "Dinobots", three are branded as "Omnibots", six are branded as "Constructicons", and seven are branded as "Insecticons"; the Dinobots and the Omnibots are both subgroups of the Autobots, while the Constructicons and the Insecticons are both subgroups of the Decepticons. Each following series of Generation 1 introduced more subgroups to the toy line, and continued the practice established by Series 2 of aligning those with names ending in the suffix "-bot" with the Autobots, and those with names ending in the suffix "-con" with the Decepticons. Rounding out the seventy-six new toys of the series, are the first two accessories of the toy line to be individually sold.[30]

All of the toys released during Series 2, both those that were new to the series, as well as the reissued versions of Series 1 toys, featured heat sensitive rub signs. These would reveal either the Autobot logo or the Decepticon logo upon being rubbed. Intended as a means of authentication, they were introduced in response to similar, though inferior, bootleg toys that were being released at the time.[31][28]

Series 2 features seven new Autobot Cars. They consist of Grapple, Hoist, Inferno, Red Alert, Skids, Smokescreen, and Track.[32] Grapple, the architect, transforms into a crane;[33] Hoist, who serves in maintenance, transforms into a Toyota Hi-Lux 4WD tow truck model;[34] Inferno, who serves in search and rescue, transforms into a fire engine;[35] Red Alert, the security director, transforms into a fire chief's Lamborghini Countach;[36] Skids, the theoretician, transforms into a Honda City Turbo;[37] Smokescreen, the diversionary tactician, transforms into a 1979 custom Datsun 280ZX;[38] and Tracks, a warrior, transforms into a 1980 Chevrolet Corvette.[39]

Series 2 features five new Autobot minicars. They consist of Beachcomber, Cosmos, Powerglide, Seaspray, and Warpath.[40] Beachcomber, the geologist, transforms into a dune buggy;[41] Cosmos, who serves in reconnaissance and communications, transforms into a flying saucer;[42] Powerglide, a warrior, transforms into an A-10 Thunderbolt II airplane;[43] Seaspray, who serves in naval defense, transforms into a hovercraft;[44] and Warpath, a warrior, transforms into a tank.[45]

Series 2 features two Autobot Jumpstarters; Topspin and Twin Twist.[46] Both of them transform into spaceships. Topspin serves in land and sea assault,[47] and Twin Twist serves in demolitions.[46]

Series 2 features two Autobot Deluxe Vehicles; Roadbuster and Whirl.[48] Roadbuster, the Ground Assault Commander, transforms into a 4-WD vehicle,[49] and Ariel, who serves in aerial assault, transforms into an Apache Helicopter.[50]

1984 and 1985[edit]

The 1984-85 lines became the foundation of the Generation 1 series, with all of the classic characters introduced here.[citation needed] The two years were actually one single run, story-wise and thematically.[citation needed] This is most evident in the first and second seasons of the animated series.[citation needed]

The toys made use of molds and designs primarily from the Microman and Diaclone lines.[citation needed] The 1985 toyline introduced the idea of special subgroup teams like the Dinobots, Constructicons and Insecticons.[citation needed] Toward the end of the animated series’ second season, several characters from the 1986 line were introduced, particularly the Combiner teams.[citation needed]

Other characters were taken from different toy lines of other companies (see Re-licenses).[citation needed]

1986[edit]

The year of 1986 saw Hasbro start using original designs for many characters as fewer Microman and Diaclone molds were recycled. This was a banner year for the toy line as the tie-in animated feature, The Transformers: The Movie, was finally released. While the movie was not the blockbuster Hasbro hoped for, it marked a change in the direction the series in general was taking.

1986 was also the last year Hasbro used a non-Takara toy for the line (Sky Lynx, originally manufactured by ToyBox. Cheap construction and disappointing features were its most notable problems).[51]

New characters Rodimus Prime and Galvatron replaced Optimus Prime and Megatron in their respective roles. Subgroup teams became prevalent. The number of new characters increased from this year on. The TV series followed the movie and was now set in the future while the comics’ storyline continued to be set in the present time. Fans[who?] also see 1986 as the start of generation 1.5[citation needed] with the movie's drastic timeline jump and character change the generation sub category 1.5 will last til generation 1 has officially ended in 1992

1987[edit]

As Transformers went on, new characters needed new gimmicks to stand out. As the number of Combiner teams had been reduced, the Headmasters and Targetmasters were introduced. Fortress Maximus and Scorponok became leaders of the Autobot and Decepticon forces respectively. The animated series had one more season but only three episodes were produced in America due to Sunbow losing its contract and its subsequent inability of renewal (coinciding with the G.I. Joe cartoon meeting their demise), leaving only the comics to support the toy line.

1988[edit]

Transformers continued on despite smaller support and still managed to introduce a plethora of new characters. New Headmaster and Targetmaster characters were introduced, but the new driving forces for the line were the Pretenders and Powermasters (which featured the return of Optimus Prime).

1989[edit]

The toy line received a new logo design for its sixth year. The subgrouping idea was changed as characters were now limited to Pretender and Micromaster groups. These two groups were further subdivided into thematic teams. A few classic characters were revamped as Pretenders.

1990[edit]

In its final year in the US market, Transformers' last burst was with a more expanded Micromaster line and the introduction of the Action Masters - non-transforming figures of classic characters with transformable vehicles and weapons.

Overseas market[edit]

Of the countries Transformers was exported to, Japan and the UK were the only ones to make some interesting twists to the toy line. Although the popularity of Transformers has waned in these two countries as well, they still managed to make some output in the interim between 1990 and 1993, before the launch of the next series, Transformers: Generation 2.

The UK releases, while in general following the American releases and storylines, omitted a fairly large selection of the original toys from the US line. The UK line first started branching away from the US line in 1990 with the re-releases of several early toys under the "Classics" banner. However, it was 1991 when the UK line went in its own unique direction. Though there were only a few characters introduced, they were toys that none of the US audience had ever seen. The 1991 and 1992 toys also found their way to Asian and Australian stores. The 1991 line did away with the Micromasters but had additional Action Master characters, in addition to re-uses of some of Takara's previously Japanese-exclusive molds.

1992 saw the release of the Autobot Turbomasters, the Decepticon Predators, yellow unnamed versions of the Constructicons (minus the parts to make Devastator), and re-colored versions of four sixths of the Japanese-exclusive Beast Force, simply known collectively as the Rescue Force. In early 1993, more exclusive figures were released under the Transformers (no subtitle) label, most notably the color-changing Stormtroopers, the Lightformers, the Trakkons, and the Autobot and Decepticon Obliterators. The heads of the Obliterators, Pyro and Clench, were the inspiration for the redesigned Autobot and Decepticon symbols that were used on this year's packaging and later used for Transformers: Generation 2.

In Japan, it was Takara, the toy company that Transformers originated from, that had the rights to distribute the toys in their country. Unlike Hasbro UK, Takara had more autonomy in regards to their releases and storyline that were running concurrent with the American line. For example, several characters appeared that were only exclusive to the Japanese market and Toei Animation continued the animated series with their own storylines.

Come 1989, Takara departed from the lineup of characters that Hasbro released that year, choosing instead with an even more different set of characters. In 1990, the Micromaster concept was embraced wholeheartedly as majority of the toys that year and the next were of that nature. 1991 would see more Micromasters released, including the fist Micromaster combiner, alongside three larger Battlestars, one of which was Star Convoy, a reborn version of Optimus Prime. Uniquely, the 1991 range in Japan consisted of only Autobot characters. The 1992 range in Japan was the final year of Generation 1, and featured several more Micromaster combiners, recolored versions of Defensor and Bruticus, and the smaller Turbomasters and Predators which were concurrently released in Europe.

Re-licenses[edit]

Toys that were re-licensed or remolded from an existing toyline or animated series.

Transformers Name Originated from Original Toy Name Original Manufacturer
Jetfire/Skyfire Super Dimension Fortress Macross VF-1S Super Valkyrie Takatoku Toys/Matsushiro Toys/Bandai
Whirl Special Armored Battalion Dorvack VH-64 MR Oberon Gazette Takatoku Toys
Roadbuster Special Armored Battalion Dorvack VV-54 AR Mugen Calibur Takatoku Toys
Barrage Armored Insect Squadron Beetras Beet Gadol Takatoku Toys
Chop Chop Armored Insect Squadron Beetras Beet Gugal Takatoku Toys
Venom Armored Insect Squadron Beetras Beet Zaguna Takatoku Toys
Ransack Armored Insect Squadron Beetras Beet Vadam Takatoku Toys
Shockwave N/A Astro Magnum ToyCo
Omega Supreme N/A Mechabot 1 ToyBox
Sky Lynx N/A Unknown ToyBox
Optimus Prime Diaclone Battle Convoy Takara
Ultra Magnus Diaclone Powered Convoy Takara
Blitzwing Diaclone Unknown Takara
Jazz Diaclone Porsche 935 Turbo Takara
Prowl Diaclone Police Car Fairlady Z Takara
Sunstreaker Diaclone Lamborghini Countach LP500S "Red" / "Police" Takara
Wheeljack Diaclone Lancia Stratos HF Turbo Takara
Ironhide Diaclone Onebox Cherry Vanette Takara
Skids Diaclone Honda City Turbo/City-R Exclusive Takara
Swoop Diaclone Pteranodon Takara
Frenzy Microchange MC01 Micross Takara
Ravage Microchange MC02 Jaguar Takara
Laserbeak Microchange MC03 Condor Takara
Cliffjumper Microchange MC04 Mini Car Robo 01 Porsche Turbo 924 Takara
Bumblebee Microchange MC04 Mini Car Robo 03 Volkswagen Beetle Takara
Gears Microchange MC04 Mini Car Robo 04 4WD Truck Takara
Brawn Microchange MC04 Mini Car Robo 05 Jeep Takara
Windcharger Microchange MC04 Mini Car Robo 06 Trans-Am Takara
Huffer Microchange MC04 Mini Car Robo 07 Semi Truck Takara
Reflector Microchange MC05 Camera Robo "Microx" Takara
Soundwave and Rumble Microchange MC10 Cassette Robo "Cassetteman" Takara
Megatron Microchange MC12 Gun Robo Walther P-38 Takara
Perceptor Microchange MC20 Micro Scope Takara
Blaster Microchange MC21 Radi-Cassette Robo Takara

Animated series[edit]

See main article The Transformers (TV series).

The animated series was produced by Sunbow Productions and Marvel Productions.

In March 2009, Shout! Factory announced that they had acquired license from Hasbro to re-release Transformers on DVD in Region 1. The Complete First Season: 25th Anniversary edition was released on June 16, 2009. The set includes 16 episodes, in addition to bonus footage, including: The history of Hasbro and the origins of Transformers. Season 2, Volume 1 was released on September 15, 2009. Season 2, Volume 2 will be released on January 12, 2010.

In addition, On October 20, 2009, Shout! Factory released the complete series in a single box set for the first time in Region 1. This set, dubbed "Transformers- The Complete Series: The Matrix of Leadership Collector's Set" features all 98 remastered episodes along with all new bonus features on 16 DVDs.[52]

Comics[edit]

Three publishers had or have the license to produce comic books based on the Transformers. Marvel Comics held the license during the original run of the toy line. Marvel's UK branch also published their own Transformers stories. Dreamwave Productions revived Transformers comics in 2002 but went bankrupt in 2005, forcing a cessation. IDW Publishing picked up the rights soon after.

Each publisher to pick up the comics rights all chose to go with their own continuity than continue the hanging storylines from the previous publisher. As the comics regularly features characters dying, thus far, this is the only way to get around regarding use of characters and issues regarding their place in continuity. Also, the series by Marvel UK used the stories from the US but as the series run weekly, additional stories had to be made to act as supplement. These UK only stories often worked in and around the US stories, offering a different experience.

As such, there are four comics continuities based on the Generation 1 characters:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A brief history of the Transformers". Malaysia Star. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 
  2. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092106/business
  3. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 4. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  4. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. pp. 11–32. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  5. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 11. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  6. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. pp. 17–26. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  7. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 17. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  8. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 18. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 19. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  10. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 20. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  11. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 21. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  12. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 22. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  13. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 23. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  14. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 24. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  15. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 25. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  16. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 26. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  17. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 13-15. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  18. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 13. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  19. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 14. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  20. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 15. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  21. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 27. ISBN 9780896894457. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  22. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 42-43. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  23. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 37-41. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  24. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 43-44. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  25. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 39-41. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  26. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 37-39. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  27. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 45-48. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  28. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 49. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  29. ^ Bellomo, Mark (October 9, 2007). Warman's Transformers Field Guide: Identification and Values. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 12-16. ISBN 9780896895843. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  30. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 49-100. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  31. ^ Bellomo, Mark (October 9, 2007). Warman's Transformers Field Guide: Identification and Values. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 12. ISBN 9780896895843. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  32. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 56-61. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  33. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 56-57. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  34. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 57-58. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  35. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 58. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  36. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 56-61. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  37. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 59-60. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  38. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 60-61. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  39. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 61. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  40. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 51-54. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  41. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 51. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  42. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 51-52. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  43. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 52-53. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  44. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 53-54. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  45. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 54. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  46. ^ a b Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 55-56. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  47. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 55. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  48. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 67-69. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  49. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 67-68. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  50. ^ Bellomo, Mark (May 9, 2007). Transformers: Identification and Price Guide (ebook ed.). Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 68-69. ISBN 9780896894457. 
  51. ^ TFArchive - Sky Lynx
  52. ^ http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/Transformers-Season-1-25th-Anniversary-Ed/11484