Gloria Stivic

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Gloria Stivic
First appearance Meet the Bunkers
(All in the Family - 1x01)
Last appearance An Uncredited Woman
(Gloria - 1x21)
Portrayed by Sally Struthers
Information
Gender Female
Occupation Department store employee; veterinarian's assistant
Family Archie Bunker (father)
Edith Bunker, née Baines (mother)
David Bunker (grandfather)
Sarah Bunker, née Longstreet (grandmother)
Alma Bunker (aunt)
Philip Bunker (uncle)
Alfred Bunker (uncle)
Linda Bunker (cousin)
Barbara Lee "Billie" Bunker (cousin)
Maude Findlay (first cousin once removed)
Walter Findlay (cousin-in-law)
Carol Traynor (second cousin))
Stephanie Mills ( step-cousin)
Spouse(s) Michael Stivic
(divorced; 1970–1982)
Children Joseph "Joey" Stivic
(son with Mike; born in December 1975)

Gloria Stivic (née Bunker), is a fictional character played by Sally Struthers on the American situation comedy All in the Family, which aired on the CBS television network from 1971 until 1979. She was the only child of Archie and Edith Bunker, and she was married to Michael Stivic. She was born 11 months after Edith and Archie were married as stated in the episode The Longest Kiss (Season 5, Episode 10).

Character overview[edit]

Gloria was often caught in the middle of arguments between her liberal husband Michael and her conservative father, Archie. As her relationship with Michael progressed, Gloria realized that her parents were wrong about a lot of things and sided with her husband's liberal beliefs.[1] Despite his affections for her, Michael was also using his marriage to get the long-sheltered Gloria to share his own beliefs as well.[1]

Gloria's mother mentioned (in the pilot) that Gloria was anemic and was therefore overprotected as a child.[2] Archie often referred to Gloria as his "little goil" [girl]. Having been babied throughout her early life, Gloria would display fondness towards being pampered.[1] With lower-than-average intelligence, Gloria dropped out of high school at the age of 16 to take a secretarial course.[1]

Gloria was the main breadwinner for the couple during the first five years of their marriage while they lived in her parents' home.[3][4] With Michael attending college, initially for his bachelor's degree, then continuing for his master's, Gloria worked full-time at a department store.[4] She was sensitive about having only a high school education.

Gloria and Mike moved to the neighboring rental house owned by former Bunker neighbor George Jefferson;[5] between seasons 1 and 5, the Jefferson family would reside in the very same house. At that time Gloria became pregnant. She then had a boy, Joey Stivic, and became a stay-at-home mother, while Michael began his teaching career. The Stivics later moved to Santa Barbara, California after Michael was offered a better paying associate professor's position at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).[1]

The Stivic marriage was tested after Gloria engaged in an affair with Bud Kreeger, a college faculty colleague of her husband. Gloria confessed this affair to her parents, while remaining silent about sleeping with him, during Archie and Edith's Christmas visit to California.

Michael and Gloria would later get arrested for engaging in a nude protest at a proposed site for nuclear power plant. This action would cost Michael his well-paid job at UCSB and left both of the Stivics cash-strapped. Eventually, Michael would abandon his family to join a commune with one of his college students.

Struthers continued playing the character of Gloria Bunker in guest appearances on Archie Bunker's Place and on the 1982–1983 related series Gloria, in which she was divorced from her husband Michael, and working in a veterinarian's office in upstate New York.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Vincent Terrace (2011). Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2010, 2d ed. McFarland & Company. p. 240. ISBN 9780786464777. Retrieved February 17, 2014. 
  2. ^ Adler, Richard (1979). All in the Family: A Critical Appraisal. Praeger. p. 17. 
  3. ^ Sagert, Kelly Boyer (2007). The 1970s. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 194. ISBN 9780313339196. 
  4. ^ a b Robinson, Lillian S. (1986). Sex, Class, Culture. New York and London: Routledge. p. 315. ISBN 9780416012415. 
  5. ^ McCrohan, Donna (1987). Archie & Edith, Mike & Gloria: The Tumultuous History of All in the Family. New York: Workman Pub. p. 178. ISBN 9780894805271. 
  6. ^ McNeil, Alex (1986). Total Television: The Comprehensive Guide to Programming from 1948 to the Present. New York: Penguin Books. ISBN 9780140249163.