Gregorio Correr

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Gregorio Correr (Corraro) (1409 – 1464) was an Italian humanist and ecclesiastic from Venice. In the last year of his life he was elected Patriarch of Venice.

Life[edit]

Coat of arms of Gregorio Correr

He was born into a patrician family of Venice; Antonio Correr was his uncle.[1] As a youth he studied in the school of Vittorino da Feltre in Mantua.[2]

San Zeno altarpiece by Mantegna, a commission from Correr

Correr was created protonotary apostolic by Pope Eugenius IV, a relation. He went with the Curia to Florence, where he encountered the humanist circle of Biondo Flavio.[3] He corresponded with Lapo da Castiglionchio the Younger.[4]

He then served as secretary to his uncle Antonio at the Council of Basle. From 1448 he was an abbot at the Basilica of San Zeno, Verona.[1] There he commissioned the celebrated San Zeno Altarpiece from Andrea Mantegna.[5] He was nominated as bishop of Padua in 1459, but lost out to Pietro Barbo when Pope Pius II refused to accept the Venetian Senate's choice.[6]

Works[edit]

There is a codex of Correr's works.[7] Around 1428 he wrote a Latin tragedy, Progne, based on the story of Procne in Ovid, and the play Thyestes by Seneca the Younger.[8] He wrote also seven satires as a pupil in Mantua, and poetry, as he mentioned in correspondence with Cecilia Gonzaga.[2] He wrote about 60 fables,[9] and also a biography of Antonio[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gary R. Grund; Albertino Mussato; Antonio Loschi; Gregorio Corraro, Leonardo Dati, Marcellinus Verardus (15 February 2011). Humanist Tragedies. Harvard University Press. pp. xxvii–xxviii. ISBN 978-0-674-05725-8. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Prudence Allen (26 January 2006). The Concept of Woman: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250-1500, Part 2. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. pp. 681–2. ISBN 978-0-8028-3347-1. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Biondo Flavio; Catherine J. Castner (1 January 2005). Biondo Flavio's Italia Illustrata: Text, Translation and Commentary, Volume 1: Northern Italy. Global Academic Publishing. p. 129. ISBN 978-1-58684-255-0. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Alison Brown (5 May 2010). The Return of Lucretius to Renaissance Florence. Harvard University Press. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-674-05032-7. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  5. ^ Gloria Fossi; Mattia Reiche, Gloria Fossi, Marco Bussagli (April 2009). Italian Art: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture from the Origins to the Present Day. Giunti Editore. p. 160. ISBN 978-88-09-03726-7. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  6. ^ David Chambers (2 August 2003). War, Culture and Society in Renaissance Venice: Essays in Honour of John Hale. Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 153–4. ISBN 978-1-85285-090-6. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Joseph R. Berrigan, Portrait of a Venetian as a Young Poet, p. 114, in Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Sanctandreani : proceedings of the Fifth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, St. Andrews, 24 August to 1 September 1982 (1986); archive.org.
  8. ^ Henry Ansgar Kelly (13 May 1993). Ideas and Forms of Tragedy from Aristotle to the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press. pp. 188–9. ISBN 978-0-521-43184-2. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  9. ^ Gerald N. Sandy (2002). The Classical Heritage in France. BRILL. p. 573. ISBN 978-90-04-11916-1. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  10. ^ Professor Alison Knowles Frazier (31 January 2005). Possible Lives: Authors And Saints In Renaissance Italy. Columbia University Press. pp. 40–1 note 126. ISBN 978-0-231-12976-3. Retrieved 11 November 2012.