Grier Raggio

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Grier Raggio
Democrat Grier Raggio For Congress 2010 Texas 32nd Congressional District.jpg
Personal details
Born Elgin, Texas
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Hon. Lorraine Raggio
Residence Dallas, Texas
Alma mater Harvard University, The University of Texas at Austin, Boston College

Grier Raggio is an American attorney and politician. He was a Democratic candidate in the 2010 election for the United States House of Representatives seat in Texas's 32nd congressional district.[1] The race had been named by The Hill as one of ten dark horse races in the nation.[2]

Personal[edit]

Raggio was born in Elgin, Texas and moved to Dallas shorty after his father returned home from service in World War II.[3] Both of his parents were attorneys and his mother Louise was a national leader in securing the equal rights of women before the law.[4] Raggio's wife Lorraine is a Civil District Court Judge in Dallas County.[5] He has three children and two grandchildren.[3]

Education and professional life[edit]

Raggio attended Highland Park High School, where he was class president and an Eagle Scout, before going onto to Harvard University.[3] Upon graduating, Raggio attended the University of Texas School of Law before finishing his Juris Doctor at Boston College.[3]

He started several small businesses and a law firm in New York City before returning to Dallas to join his family's law practice.[6]

Campaign[edit]

Raggio formally announced his candidacy in June 2009.[7]

Raggio ran a campaign premised on accountability and transparency, promising to pursue comprehensive ethics reform. A committed environmentalist, he believes that the United States should commit itself to reducing fossil fuel consumption by 50% before 2020.

Raggio's campaign was hurt by a national environment in which Republicans, led by Raggio's opponent NRCC Chairman Pete Sessions, saw massive gains nationwide and in Texas. On November 2, 2010, Raggio was defeated 63%-35%.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeffers (July 28, 2009). "Democrat thinks he is a contender". WFAAfirst=Gromer, Jr. Retrieved September 15, 2009. [dead link]
  2. ^ "Dark horse races to watch in 2010". The Hill. July 6, 2009. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Grier Raggio: Profile". Raggio for Congress. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Editorial: Happy birthday, Louise Raggio". The Dallas Morning News. June 12, 2009. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Civil District Courts". Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Law Offices of Raggio & Raggio". Raggio & Raggio. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  7. ^ Willey, Keven Ann (June 12, 2009). "Raggio versus Sessions". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 

External links[edit]