Hanscom Park

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Hanscom Park
Hanscom Park (Omaha) 3.JPG
Lake at Hanscom Park
Type Municipal (Omaha)
Location Midtown Omaha
Created 1899
Status Open all year

Hanscom Park is a historic neighborhood in Midtown Omaha, Nebraska. Its namesake public park is one of the oldest parks in Omaha, donated to the City in 1872.[1] U.S. President Gerald R. Ford was born in a house in the Hanscom Park neighborhood.[2] Its boundaries are Center Street on the north, South 42nd on the west, Interstate 480 on the east and I-80 on the south.[3]

History[edit]

Replica Historic Bandstand

Hanscom Park is one of the oldest parks and residential subdivisions in Omaha. Andrew J. Hanscom and James Megeath donated the 50-acre (200,000 m2) park in October 1872. Hanscom bought the land from Colonel Sam Bayliss, one of the original homesteaders in Omaha City in 1854.[4] When the community was developed through the 1890s, it was on the western fringe of Omaha. The site was ideal for an upscale development because of its access to a new electric trolley line connecting it with downtown.[5]

The neighborhood is home to several notable houses. One of them, the George N. Hicks House, has been designated an Omaha Landmark.[6] In 1913, U.S. President Gerald Ford was born in his grandfather's mansion at 3202 Woolworth Avenue in the Hanscom Park neighborhood. Today the Gerald R. Ford Birthsite and Gardens celebrates this location.[7]

The park[edit]

Hanscom Park, located at 1899 South 32nd Avenue, was developed by the City of Omaha in 1889 as one of the first by the newly formed Park Commission. After paying a landscape architect $913.30 for plans to improve the rough tract of land, the Commission reported the park was, "radically changed in plan and very greatly improved... Two lakes, a cascade, extensive flower beds, two and one-half miles of macadamized roadway, fountains and a magnificent growth of forest trees makes this the only finished park in the city." Design elements from that time have survived.[8] The Brandeis Indoor Tennis Courts facility is also located within the park property.

Present[edit]

After years of historical houses in the neighborhood being converted into apartments, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of properties that have been returned to single family homes during the past few years.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Washburn, T. (2004) "What Kind Of History Haunts Your House? Homeowners Research Their Houses." KETV. 7/14/04. Retrieved 6/26/07.
  2. ^ Arens, C. (2001) "From Woolworth Ave. to the White House." Nebraska Life Magazine. Retrieved 6/26/07.
  3. ^ (2009) ("About Hanscom Park", Hanscom Park Neighborhood Association. Retrieved 9/3/10.
  4. ^ Roenfeld, R. (nd) "Sam Bayliss on Broadway." Historical Society of Pottawatomie County. Retrieved 6/26/07.
  5. ^ Washburn, T. (2004) "What Kind Of History Haunts Your House? Homeowners Research Their Houses." KETV. 7/14/04. Retrieved 6/26/07.
  6. ^ (nd) Hicks House. City of Omaha Landmark Heritage Commission. Retrieved 6/25/07.
  7. ^ Arens, C. (2001) "From Woolworth Ave. to the White House." Nebraska Life Magazine. Retrieved 6/26/07.
  8. ^ (nd) Hanscom Park. City of Omaha. Retrieved 6/25/07.
  9. ^ (nd) Resources. Restore Omaha. Retrieved 6/25/07.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°14′31″N 95°57′29″W / 41.24194°N 95.95806°W / 41.24194; -95.95806