Harman v. Forssenius

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Harman v. Forssenius
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued March 1–2, 1965
Decided April 27, 1965
Full case name Harman v. Forssenius
Citations 380 U.S. 528 (more)
85 S. Ct. 1177; 14 L. Ed. 2d 50; 1965 U.S. LEXIS 1347
Holding
Virginia's law partially eliminating the poll tax violated the Twenty-fourth Amendment.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Warren, joined by unanimous

Harman v. Forssenius was a 1965 United States Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that Virginia's law partially eliminating the poll tax violated the Twenty-fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. Virginia had attempted to dodge this anti-poll tax constitutional amendment by allowing for the poll tax to be waived if the would-be voter filed a certificate of residency six months prior to the election. This decision essentially was the death knell for the poll tax in Virginia.

See also[edit]