Hawkes Ocean Technologies

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Hawkes Ocean Technologies is a marine engineering firm that specializes in consumer submarines, founded by Graham Hawkes.[1] It is headquartered in San Francisco.[2]

Hawkes Remotes[edit]

Hawkes Remotes is a subsidiary that builds ROVs (remotely operated vehicles), unmanned robotic submarines.[3]

DeepFlight[edit]

Hawkes builds the DeepFlight range of submersibles, which uses hydrodynamic forces for diving, instead of ballast.[4] The subs are all-electric.[5] All or some of them have two pairs of wings like an airplane's, one pair front and the other pair rear, shorter than an airplane's and the other way up so they push the submarine down.

DeepFlight submersibles
DeepFlight I was sponsored by TV firms, and serve as technology testbed for DeepFlight II.[7]
Wet Flight was used in filming of "Dolphins: The Ride"/[9]
DeepFlight II was designed on AutoCAD.[11]
With an operational depth of 1500ft, the Aviator is the first of its kind positively-buoyant submersible. It relies solely on hydrodynamic forces to dive. It was designed completely on a computer.[13]
The Challenger was designed for Steve Fossett's attempt at the world's deepest point, Challenger Deep.[15]
The SuperFalcon is much more maneuverable than all subs preceding it.[18] Unlike most subs, it does not have a circular pressure hull.[19] The first example was built for Tom Perkins,[20] and launched in 2008.[21] At the time of launch, it was the most advanced personal submarine in the world.[22]
The initial example is called Necker Nymph and run by Virgin Limited Edition.[24][25]

Other submersibles[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ New Scientist, Volume 187, Issue 2513, Page 30, 2005
  2. ^ The Australian, "Aussies help director dive to bottom of deepest ocean for Avatar 2", John Harlow, 13 September 2010 (accessed 12 September 2010)
  3. ^ CNET News, "Oceans' salvation may lie in exploration", Daniel Terdiman, 15 April 2010 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  4. ^ Forbes, "Submarines For The Super-Rich", Joumana Saad, 2010 May 11 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  5. ^ Reve, http://www.evwind.es/noticias.php?id_not=6921 "The Future of Electric A
  6. ^ DeepFlight, DeepFlight I (accessed 5 September 2010)
  7. ^ Popular Science, "Underwater Airplane", D.S., March 1997, pp.25
  8. ^ DeepFlight, WetFlight (accessed 5 September 2010)
  9. ^ DeepFlight, "Wet Flight" (accessed 2 March 2013)
  10. ^ DeepFlight, DeepFlight II (accessed 5 September 2010)
  11. ^ McGraw-Hill, "Applying AutoCAD 2000", Terry T. Wohlers, 1999, pp.632
  12. ^ DeepFlight, DeepFlight Aviator (accessed 5 September 2010)
  13. ^ Computer Graphics World, "Flying Deep", D. Phillips Mahoney, March 2001, Vol.24, No.3
  14. ^ DeepFlight, DeepFlight Challenger (accessed 5 September 2010)
  15. ^ Composites World, "Deepsea submersible incorporates composite pressure capsule", Sara Black, 31 August 2010 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  16. ^ DeepFlight, DeepFlight SuperFalcon (accessed 5 September 2010)
  17. ^ CNET News, "Steve Fossett's unfinished legacy: Deepest ocean exploration", Daniel Terdiman 3 October 2008 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  18. ^ BBC News, "Underwater 'flying machine' launched", Maggie Shiels, 14 May 2009 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  19. ^ USA Today, "Personal submarine prepares for launch", Marco R. della Cava, 7 July 2008 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  20. ^ New Scientist, "Winged submarine is Ferrari of the depths", 14 May 2009 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  21. ^ Daily Mail (UK), "Water way to travel! Super winged submersible that 'flies' through the ocean unveiled", Claire Bates, 19 May 2009 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  22. ^ Forbes, "Sub Prime", John Sedgwick, 21 April 2008 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  23. ^ DeepFlight, DeepFlight Merlin (accessed 5 September 2010)
  24. ^ Wired.com, "Branson Takes You Flying Underwater", Jason Paur, 3 February 2010 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  25. ^ Popular Mechanics, "Richard Branson Dives Into Personal Submarines With Hawkes", Cassie Rodenberg, 11 March 2010
  26. ^ a b c d DeepFlight, Subs (accessed 5 September 2010)
  27. ^ a b Welcome to ANSYS Advantage!, "Taking Next-Generation Submersibles to New Depths", A. Wright, 2007 (accessed 5 September 2010)
  28. ^ New York Times, "SCIENTIST AT WORK: Graham Hawkes; Racing to the Bottom Of the Deep, Black Sea", William J. Broad, 1993 August 3 (accessed 25 March 2012)
  29. ^ DeepFlight, Sphere (accessed 5 September 2010)

External links[edit]