Henri Cole

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This article is about the biography of Henri Cole. For his poetic influence, see Poetry in the early 21st century.

Henri Cole (born 1956) is an American poet, who has published collections of poetry in English, French, Spanish, and Italian.

Henri Cole
Henri Cole.jpg
Born May 9, 1956
Fukuoka, Japan
Occupation Poet

Biography[edit]

Henri Cole was born in Fukuoka, Japan, to an American father and French-Armenian[1] mother, and raised in Virginia, United States. His father, a North Carolinian, enlisted in the service after graduating from high school and, while stationed in Marseilles, met Cole's mother, who worked at the PX. Together they lived in Japan, Germany, Illinois, California, Nevada, Missouri and Virginia, where Cole attended public schools and the College of William and Mary. He has published nine collections of poetry in English.

From 1982 until 1988 he was executive director of The Academy of American Poets.[2] Since that time he has held many teaching positions and been the artist-in-residence at various institutions, including Brandeis University, Columbia University, Davidson College, Harvard University, Ohio State University, Reed College, Smith College, The College of William and Mary, and Yale University. He has collaborated with the visual artists Jenny Holzer and Kiki Smith.[3] And from 2010 to 2014, he was poetry editor of The New Republic. Recently, Cole was appointed Professor of Literature at Claremont McKenna College. He lives in Boston.

Books of poetry[edit]

  • 2015: Nothing to Declare, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux [4]
  • 2015: Le Merle, Le Loup suivi de Toucher (French translation by Claire Malroux), Paris: Le bruit du temps [5]
  • 2011: Touch, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux [6]
  • 2011: Terre Médiane (French translation by Claire Malroux), Paris: Le bruit du temps[7]
  • 2010: Mirlo y Lobo (Spanish translation by Eduardo López Truco), Cantabria: Quálea Editorial [8]
  • 2010: Autoritratto con Gatti (Italian translation by Massimo Bacigalupo), Parma: Guanda Editore [9]
  • 2010: Pierce the Skin (Selected Poems, 1982-2007), New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux [10]
  • 2008: La Apariencia de la Cosas (Spanish translation by Eduardo López Truco), Cantabria: Quálea Editorial [11]
  • 2007: Blackbird and Wolf, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux [12]
  • 2005: Vingt-Deux Poèmes (French translation by Claire Malroux), Paris: Yvon Lambert[13]
  • 2003: Middle Earth, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux [14]
  • 1998: The Visible Man, New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux [15]
  • 1995: The Look of Things[16]
  • 1989: The Zoo Wheel of Knowledge[17]
  • 1986: The Marble Queen[18]

Awards and honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lydon, Christopher (December 2009). "Out of Yearning, Order: Henri Cole's poetry". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 2012-07-03. 
  2. ^ http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/henri-cole
  3. ^ "Jenny Holzer collaborations". art21.org. Art21. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  4. ^ "Nothing to Declare". Macmillan. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  5. ^ "Le Merle, Le Loup". Le bruit du temps. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  6. ^ "Touch". Macmillan. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  7. ^ "Terre Mediane". Le bruit du temps. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  8. ^ "Mirlo y Lobo". Culturamas. Culturamas. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  9. ^ "Autoitratto con Gatti". Guanda Editore. Guanda Editore. 
  10. ^ "Pierce the Skin". Macmillan. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  11. ^ "La Apariencia de la Cosas". Casa del Libro. Casa del Libro. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  12. ^ "Blackbird and Wolf". Macmillan. Macmillan. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  13. ^ "Vingt-Deux Poems". lesoressesdureel.com. Les presses du reel. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  14. ^ "Middle Earth". Macmillan. Macmillan. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  15. ^ "The Visible Man". Macmillan. Macmillan. 
  16. ^ "The Look of Things". amazon.com. amazon. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  17. ^ "The Zoo Wheel of Knowledge". goodreads.com. Good Reads. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  18. ^ "The Marble Queen". goodreads.com. Good Reads. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  19. ^ "Fellow". Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  20. ^ ""Publishing Triangle Winners Unveiled", GalleyCat, 04/20/2012". 
  21. ^ "Jackson Poetry Prize". Poets & Writers. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  22. ^ "Phi Beta Kappa Poet". Harvard Magazine. Harvard Magazine. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  23. ^ "LA Times Book Award". events.latimes.com. LA Times. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  24. ^ "Academy of Arts and Sciences" (PDF). amacad.org. American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  25. ^ "Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize". poets.org. Academy of American Poets. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  26. ^ "Ambassador Book Award". wikipedia.com. Ambassador Book Awards. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  27. ^ "Massachusetts Book Award". yumpu.com. Massachusetts Center for the Book. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  28. ^ "Lambda Literary Award". lambdaliterary.org. Lambda Literary Awards. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  29. ^ "United States Artists Fellowship". unitedstatesartists.org. United States Artists. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  30. ^ Hennessy, Christopher (May 2005). "An Interview by Christopher Hennessy". American Poetry Review. Retrieved 2010-07-12. 
  31. ^ "Guggenheim Fellowship". gf.org. John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. 
  32. ^ "Award in Literature". artsandletters.org. American Academy of Arts and Letters. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  33. ^ "Pulitzer". pulitzer.org. Pulitzer. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  34. ^ "LA Times Book Award". events.latimes.com. LA Times. 
  35. ^ "Massachusetts Book Award". bpl.org. Boston Public Library. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  36. ^ "Japan Fellowship". jusfc.gov. Japan-United States Friendship Commission. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  37. ^ "Berlin Prize". americanacademy.de. American Academy in Berlin. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  38. ^ "Rome Prize". nytimes.com. American Academy in Rome. 
  39. ^ "NEA Fellowship" (PDF). arts.gov. National Endowment for the Arts. 
  40. ^ "Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship". amylowell.org. Choate, Hall & Stewart. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  41. ^ "Ingram Merrill Fellowship". wikipedia.com. Wikipedia. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 

External links[edit]