Henry Hornbostel

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Henry Hornbostel (1867–1961) was an American architect.

He designed more than 225 buildings, bridges, and monuments in the United States; currently 22 are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, he graduated in 1891 from Columbia University and also studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, France. He was a partner, over his career, in the New York firms of Howell, Stokes & Hornbostel; Wood, Palmer & Hornbostel; Palmer & Hornbostel; and Palmer, Hornbostel & Jones. He also practiced independently from a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania office.

Buildings[edit]

Nearly half of his works (110) were in Pittsburgh, an industrial boomtown in the early twentieth century, where in 1904 he won the campus design competition for Andrew Carnegie's Carnegie Technical Schools (today's Carnegie Mellon University). He also helped to establish Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture that same year. He also designed many of the original buildings of Emory University in Atlanta.

Among his many landmarks are:

Hornbostel is also noted for his work on the Queensboro Bridge (1909), and the Hell Gate Bridge (1916) done jointly with Gustav Lindenthal.

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