Himalayacetus

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Himalayacetus
Temporal range: Early Eocene, 53.5Ma
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Cetacea
Suborder: Archaeoceti
Family: Ambulocetidae
Thewissen, Williams & Hussain 2001
Genus: Himalayacetus
Bajpai & Gingerich 1998
Binomial name
Himalayacetus subathuensis
Bajpai & Gingerich 1998

Himalayacetus is an extinct genus of carnivorous aquatic mammal of the family Ambulocetidae. The holotype was found in Himachal Pradesh, India, (31°00′N 77°00′E / 31.0°N 77.0°E / 31.0; 77.0: paleocoordinates 3°30′N 69°42′E / 3.5°N 69.7°E / 3.5; 69.7)[1] in what was the remnants of the ancient Tethys Ocean during the Early Eocene. This makes Himalayacetus the oldest archaeocete known, extending the fossil record of whales some 3.5 million years.[2]

Himalayacetus lived in the ancient coastline of the ancient Tethys Ocean before the Indian Plate had collided with the Cimmerian coast. Just like Gandakasia, Himalayacetus is only known from a single jaw fragment, making comparisons to other Ambulocetids difficult.[3]

Description[edit]

Upon its discovery, Himalayacetus was described as a pakicetid because the dentary has a small mandibular canal and a dentition similar to Pakicetus.[2] Thewissen, Williams & Hussain 2001 assigned Himalaycetus to the ambulocetids.

Etymology[edit]

Himalayacetus was named by Bajpai & Gingerich 1998. Its type is Himalayacetus subathuensis after the Himalayas, cetus, "whale", and the Subathu Formation, the type locality.[4]

Taxonomy[edit]

It was considered monophyletic by Uhen (2010). It was assigned to Pakicetidae by Bajpai and Gingerich (1998) and McLeod and Barnes (2008); and to Ambulocetidae by Thewissen et al. (2001) and Uhen (2010).[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Kuthar Nala (Eocene of India) in the Paleobiology Database. Retrieved June 2013.
  2. ^ a b Bajpai & Gingerich 1998, Abstract
  3. ^ Thewissen, JGM. "Ambulocetidae: The First Costal Whales". Retrieved February 2013. 
  4. ^ Bajpai & Gingerich 1998, p. 15464
  5. ^ Himalayacetus in the Paleobiology Database. Retrieved June 2013.

References[edit]