I Sang Dixie

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"I Sang Dixie"
Single by Dwight Yoakam
from the album Buenas Noches from a Lonely Room
B-side "Floyd County"
Released October 1988
Format 7" 45 RPM
Recorded 1988
Genre Country
Length 3:28
Label Reprise 27715
Writer(s) Dwight Yoakam
Producer(s) Pete Anderson
Dwight Yoakam singles chronology
"Streets of Bakersfield"
(1988)
"I Sang Dixie"
(1988)
"I Got You"
(1989)

"I Sang Dixie" is a song written and recorded by American country music artist Dwight Yoakam. It was released in October 1988 as the second single from his album Buenas Noches from a Lonely Room. It peaked at #1 in the United States in 1989.[1]

Content[edit]

The song's narrator describes meeting a man from the southern United States dying on a street in Los Angeles. The narrator, while crying, holds the man and sings 'Dixie' to comfort him as he dies. He goes on to describe how others "walk on by" ignoring the man's suffering. The dying man warns the narrator with his final words to "run back home to that southern land" and escape "what life here has done to me".

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1988–1989) Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[2] 1

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1989) Position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[3] 6
US Country Songs (Billboard)[4] 23
Preceded by
"Big Wheels in the Moonlight"
by Dan Seals
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number-one single

February 25, 1989
Succeeded by
"I Still Believe in You"
by The Desert Rose Band

Demo Version[edit]

Yoakam originally recorded a demo version of the song in 1981. It can be found on his 2002 boxed set, Reprise Please,Baby and on the 2004 compilation, Dwight's Used Records.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944-2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 403. 
  2. ^ "Dwight Yoakam Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for Dwight Yoakam.
  3. ^ "RPM Top 100 Country Tracks of 1989". RPM. December 23, 1989. Retrieved August 28, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Best of 1989: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1989. Retrieved August 28, 2013. 

External links[edit]