If You're Happy and You Know It

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"If You're Happy and You Know It" is a popular repetitive children's song, credited to Joe Raposo, who filed a copyright for the song in 1971.[1] The song has been noted for its similarities to "Molodejnaya", a song appearing in the 1938 Soviet musical film Volga-Volga.[2][3]

Like many children's cantations, there are many versions of the lyrics. A popular version goes:

If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!
(clap, clap)
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!
(clap, clap)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it;
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!
(clap, clap)

This verse is usually followed by three more, which follow the same pattern but say: "If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet!" (stomp, stomp); "If you're happy and you know it, shout 'hurray'! Hurray!" or "shout 'amen'! Amen!"; and, "If you're happy and you know it, do all three! (clap, clap, stomp, stomp) Hurray!/Amen!" Older versions of the song tend to say "and you really want to show it" in place of "then your face will surely show it"; the form "then you really ought to show it" has also been used. Many variations on the substance of the first three verses exist, including:

"... say 'hurray'!"
"... say 'amen'!"
"... shout/say 'ha ha'!"
"... shout/say, 'We are'!"
"... slap your knees!"
"... slap your legs!"
"... turn around!"
"... snap your fingers!"
"... nod your head!"
"... tap your toe!"
"... honk your nose!"
"... pat your head!"

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