Jean-Michel Defaye

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Jean-Michel Defaye (born 1932) is a French pianist, composer,[1] arranger and conductor known for his collaboration with French poet and singer-songwriter Léo Ferré.

He was born in Saint-Mandé, Val-de-Marne near Paris, on 18 September 1932. Aged ten he entered the Paris Conservatoire and completed his musical training in theory, piano and composition, taking in Nadia Boulanger's accompaniment class. In 1952 he won the Premier Second Grand Prix de Rome and the following year he won second prize in composition for the Belgian Queen Elisabeth competition.[citation needed]

As a composer he wrote mostly for brass and especially trombone.

As an arranger, he worked during ten years with Léo Ferré. He is mostly known by general public in France today for this body of work.

Classical works[edit]

  • Suite Marine
  • Morceau de Concours I (SG 1-2)
  • Morceau de Concours II (SG 3-4)
  • Morceau de Concours III (SG 5)
  • Deux Danses, for trombone and piano (1954)
  • Quatre pièces, for trombones quartet (1954)
  • Sonatine (1956)[2]
  • Mouvement, for trombone and piano (1972)
  • Fluctuations, for solo trombone, 6 trombones & 2 percussions (1987)
  • À la manière de Bach, for trombone & piano (1990)
  • Suite entomologique, for trombone & piano (1992)
  • Œuvre de concours I, for trombone & piano (1993)
  • Œuvre de concours II, for trombone & piano (1993)
  • Œuvre de concours III, for trombone & piano (1993)
  • À la manière de Schumann, for trombone & piano (2000)
  • À la manière de Debussy, for trombone & piano (2001)
  • À la manière de Vivaldi, for trombone & piano (2002)
  • À la manière de Stravinsky, for trombone & piano (2005)

Discography[edit]

with Léo Ferré[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Turnevicius, Leonard (28 October 2003). "Bellows and Brass blow hot and cold at Mac". The Spectator. Retrieved 22 February 2011. 
  2. ^ Hinson, Maurice; Roberts, Wesley (2006). The Piano in Chamber Ensemble: an Annotated Guide. Indiana University Press. p. 340. ISBN 978-0-253-34696-4. Retrieved 15 February 2011.