Jeffery D. Long

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Jeffery D. Long is Professor of Religion and Asian Studies at Elizabethtown College, in Pennsylvania, USA. He is associated with the Vedanta Society, DĀNAM (the Dharma Academy of North America) and the Hindu American Foundation.[1][2][3] A major theme of Long's work is religious pluralism, a topic he approaches from a perspective informed by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and which he refers to as a "Hindu process theology."[4]

Career and Publications[edit]

Long has authored three books, A Vision for Hinduism: Beyond Hindu Nationalism, Jainism: An Introduction, and The Historical Dictionary of Hinduism.[5][6][7] He has had articles published in Prabuddha Bharata, The Journal of Religion, Science and Spirit, and Creative Transformation, among others.[8] Long also contributed to the Hindu American Foundation's "Hyperlink to Hinduphobia: Online Hatred, Extremism and Bigotry Against Hindus", writing that even "[t]hough it is less well known in [the United States], anti-Hindu bigotry is every bit as ugly and dangerous as anti-Semitism or racism, and every bit as present on the Internet.[9]

Long has published and presented a number of articles and papers on Hinduism and Hindu identity. He helped organize various portions of the 6th DĀNAM Conference in 2008; specifically, he was responsible for the Book Review: Review of Yoga Books and The 'H-Word': Non-Indian Practitioners and the Question of Hindu Identity sessions. Long also presided over the DĀNAM Business Meeting and Call for Papers session. He presented at the same conference; his presentation was titled Hindu-To Be or Not To Be: Three Possible Reasons for Aversion to the Term 'Hindu' among Western Practitioners.[10] Other presentation forums include the Association for Asian Studies, the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, and the American Academy of Religion.[11]

Long lent his expertise to the Hindu American Foundation during their lawsuit against the California Board of Education.[12]

Education[edit]

Long received his B.A. in 1991 from the University of Notre Dame. His M.A. and Ph.D. were earned at the University of Chicago in 1993 and 2000, respectively.[13]

References[edit]