John Bernard Partridge

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For others with the same name, see John Partridge.

John Bernard Partridge (11 October 1861 – 9 August 1945)[1] was an English illustrator. Born in London, he was the son of Professor Richard Partridge, F.R.S., president of the Royal College of Surgeons, and nephew of John Partridge, portrait-painter extraordinary to Queen Victoria. For some years he was well known as an actor under the name of Bernard Gould.[2]

Partridge was educated at Stonyhurst College, and after matriculating at the University of London entered the office of Dunn & Hansom, architects.[3] He then joined for a couple of years a firm of stained-glass designers (Lavers, Barraud and Westlake), learning drapery and ornament; and then studied and executed church ornament under Philip Westlake, 1880–1884. He began illustration for the press and practised watercolour painting, but his chief success was derived from book illustration.

In 1891 he joined the staff of Punch [4] and, in 1910, became its chief cartoonist, replacing Edward Linley Sambourne. During his time at Punch, Partridge published several cartoons showing his support for the Suffragist movement. He was elected a member of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours and of The Pastel Society. In 1915, he designed World War I posters, some of which are now held at the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, including Take up the Sword of Justice (H33861/33).

In 1925, he was knighted by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin and gave his support to the government during the General Strike.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Obituary: Sir Bernard Partridge". The Times (p.6 col.5). 11 August 1945. 
  2. ^ "Bernard Partridge". British Cartoon Archive. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  3. ^ "Bernard Partridge". Spartacus Educational. Retrieved 14 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "PARTRIDGE, Bernard". Who's Who, 59: p. 1362. 1907. 

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