John Edward McCarthy

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For other people named John McCarthy, see John McCarthy (disambiguation).

John Edward McCarthy (1911 – 1977) was a radio actor and announcer. Born on a farm near Parnell, Michigan, he attended St. Thomas High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan and attended the University of Michigan.

Before World War II, he was an announcer at radio stations WMBC and WXYZ in Detroit, Michigan. On WXYZ in the late 1930s he also played the part of Ned Jordan, secret agent, a radio drama serial. Just before World War II, he became Chief Announcer at WXYZ.

During World War II, he was a Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps and was stationed on Eniwetok Atoll in the Marshall Islands in the Pacific where he ran the Armed Forces Radio Station.

He played the part of the Green Hornet on the famous radio series from 1947 until the program ended in December 1952. The program originated from WXYZ in Detroit, Michigan. At that time, he was known as “Jack McCarthy.” For several years until 1952 he was also station manager at WXYZ. During those years, two other national radio dramas originated from WXYZ radio: The Lone Ranger and Challenge of the Yukon (also known as Sergeant Preston of the Yukon).

During his early career in radio, he worked with Danny Thomas, Mike Wallace, Douglas Edwards and Al Hodge (who later went on to play television's Captain Video).

In 1936 He married Virginia Hanlon (1909-1997) and had two children: J. Thomas McCarthy (born 1937) and Maureen C. McCarthy (born 1953).

McCarthy moved to New York City in 1954, doing radio and television commercials. He also reported the news at WPIX television. Because there was already a “Jack McCarthy” on staff at WPIX, John McCarthy became known in New York as “John E. McCarthy.” In July 1956 McCarthy was taken to the liner SS Ile de France to interview survivors of the sinking of the SS Andrea Doria ocean liner bound for New York harbor.

McCarthy was a devout Catholic and served as a lector at St. Ignatius Loyola Church in New York City. He died in 1977 and is buried in St. Patrick’s Church cemetery in Parnell, Michigan.

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