John Hartley (academic)

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John Hartley
Born 1948
London, England
Alma mater University of Wales
Main interests
Cultural science, media studies
Major works
Reading Television
Notable awards
John Curtin Distinguished Professor

John Hartley AM, FAHA, FRSA, ICA Fellow, (born 1948[1]) is an academic who is (as of 2014) Professor of Cultural Science and Director of the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University in Western Australia, and Professor of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University. He has published over twenty books about communication, journalism, media and cultural studies, many of which have been translated into other languages.

Early life[edit]

Hartley was born in London, England. He attended Sir Roger Manwood's School, and completed a Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) in English Language and Literature at the University of Wales in 1975.[1][2][3] He moved to Australia in 1985.[1]

Academic life[edit]

Hartley's career spans Wales and Australia (Western Australia and Queensland).

Hartley worked at the Polytechnic of Wales from 1975 to 1984, initially as a research assistant and tutor, and then as a lecturer in communication and cultural studies. From 1985 to 1995 he held a number of positions at Murdoch University, ranging from lecturer to Director of the Centre for Research in Culture and Communication. In 1990 he received a PhD in communications[3] from Murdoch University. He was a professor at Edith Cowan University from 1995 to 1998.[1][4][5]

From 1996 to 2000 Hartley was Head of the newly created Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University,[1][6] and Director of its[7] Tom Hopkinson Centre for Media Research.[4][5] In 2000 he received a Doctor of Letters from the University of Wales.[1][2]

In 1998 Hartley founded[8][better source needed] the International Journal of Cultural Studies, published by Sage Publications Ltd in London.[5][9][10]

He was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 2001.[4]

Hartley was Dean of the Creative Industries Faculty at Queensland University of Technology from 2000 to 2005.[1][5][10] He was an Australian Research Council (ARC) Federation Fellow and Research Director at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation at Queensland University of Technology from 2005 to 2010.[1][6][11][12]

In 2006 he was made a Life Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, having been a member since 1996.[1][5][10]

In 2012 he became a Fellow of the International Communication Association.[1][13]

Since 2012 Hartley has been Professor of Cultural Science and Director of the Centre for Culture and Technology at Curtin University,[14] and Professor of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University.[6]

In December 2012 he was recognised for his academic contributions by being awarded the title of John Curtin Distinguished Professor.[15][16]

In 2014 the Queensland University of Technology announced the John Hartley Oxford Institute Summer Doctoral Programme Scholarship, to allow two students per year for the next five to six years to attend the Oxford Internet Institute's summer doctoral programme. The scholarship is funded in part by "a generous personal gift" from Hartley, matched by funds from the university.[17]

Hartley holds current project grants from ARC to the value of over $1.5m.[citation needed]

Publications[edit]

Hartley has published over twenty books about communication, journalism, media and cultural studies,[18][19] and over 200 papers.[6][15] His works have been translated into over a dozen languages.[10][20]

He published his first book, Reading Television, in 1978. The book, co-authored with John Fiske, was the first to analyse television from a cultural perspective, and is considered a defining publication in the field.[21][22] It sold over 100,000 copies, in seven languages.[23]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Reading Television. Methuen. 1978.  (with John Fiske)
  • Understanding News. Methuen. 1982. 
  • Making Sense of the Media. Comedia. 1985.  (with others)
  • Tele-ology: Studies in Television. Routledge. 1992. [24]
  • The Politics of Pictures: The Creation of the Public in the Age of Popular Media. Routledge. 1993. [25]
  • Telling Both Stories: Aboriginal Australia and the Media. Arts Enterprise, Edith Cowan University. 1996.  (with Alan McKee)[26]
  • Popular Reality: Journalism, Modernity, Popular Culture. Arnold. 1996. [26]
  • Uses of Television. Routledge. 1999. [26]
  • American Cultural Studies: A Reader. Oxford University Press. 2000.  (with others)[26]
  • The Indigenous Public Sphere: The Reporting and Reception of Aboriginal Issues in the Australian Media. Oxford University Press. 2000.  (with Alan McKee)[26]
  • Reading Television: 25th Anniversary Edition. Routledge. 2003.  (with John Fiske)
  • A Short History of Cultural Studies. Sage Publications. 2003. [26]
  • Creative Industries. Wiley-Blackwell. 2005. [27]
  • TV50. Australian Centre for the Moving Image. 2006. [28]
  • Television Truths: Forms of Knowledge in Popular Culture. Wiley-Blackwell. 2007. [29]
  • The Uses of Digital Literacy. University of Queensland Press. 2009. [30]
  • Story Circle: Digital Storytelling Around the World. Wiley-Blackwell. 2009.  (with Kelly McWilliam)[31]
  • Communication, Cultural and Media Studies: The Key Concepts (4th ed.). Routledge. 2011 [1983]. [32]
  • Digital Futures for Cultural and Media Studies. Wiley-Blackwell. 2012. [33]
  • Walter J Ong (2012). Orality and Literacy (30th Anniversary ed.). Routledge.  (Foreword, afterword)[34]
  • Key Concepts in Creative Industries. Sage Publication. 2013.  (with others)[35]
  • A Companion to New Media Dynamics. Wiley-Blackwell. 2013.  (with others)[36]
  • Cultural Science: A Natural History of Stories, Demes, Knowledge and Innovation. Bloomsbury. 2014.  (with Jason Potts)[37]

Honours[edit]

In 2001 Hartley received the Centenary Medal for "service to Australian society and the humanities in cultural and communication studies".[1][5][38]

Hartley was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 2009, for "service to education as an academic and commentator in the areas of journalism, culture and media studies".[5][19][39][40]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Prof. John Arthur Edmund HARTLEY". Who's Who Australia. ConnectWeb, AAP Directories. Retrieved 14 December 2014. (registration required (help)). 
  2. ^ a b "Professor John Hartley: Biography". Cardiff University. Retrieved 21 December 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "John Hartley". LinkedIn. Retrieved 25 December 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c "Hartley, John, AM FAHA". Australian Academy of the Humanities. Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia (PDF), Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor-General, Commonwealth of Australia, p. 55, retrieved 13 December 2014 
  6. ^ a b c d "Professor John Hartley". Cardiff University. Retrieved 14 December 2014. 
  7. ^ "Media conference attracts international speakers". Cardiff University. 8 January 2008. Notes to Editors: 1. Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. Retrieved 25 December 2014. 
  8. ^ John Hartley (2006). "Lament for a Lost Running Order? Obsolescence and Academic Journals". M/C Journal. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  9. ^ "International Journal of Cultural Studies". Sage Journals. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  10. ^ a b c d "John Hartley". Digital Storytelling. Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  11. ^ "Distinguished Professor John Hartley". ARC Cultural Research Network. 17 August 2006. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  12. ^ "John Hartley (QUT, Australia)". M/C Journal. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  13. ^ "ICA Fellows". International Communication Association. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  14. ^ "Staff Profile". Curtin University. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  15. ^ a b "Distinguished Professor appointment for John Hartley". Centre for Culture and Technology. Curtin University. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  16. ^ "Honorary Award Recipients: List of John Curtin Distinguished Professors". Curtin University. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  17. ^ "Scholarship support for digital media and communication research". Queensland University of Technology. 3 October 2014. Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  18. ^ "John Hartley". Bloomsbury Publishing. Retrieved 29 December 2014. 
  19. ^ a b "Professor John Hartley". ICA Brisbane. Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  20. ^ "Professor John Hartley, Publications". Cardiff University. Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  21. ^ "Fiske Matters". 2010. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  22. ^ Timothy Havens. "Teaching the Lone Television Studies Graduate Seminar". Project Muse. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  23. ^ Toby Miller (2010). Television Studies: The Basics. Routledge. p. 10. Retrieved 29 December 2014. 
  24. ^ "Tele-ology: Studies in Television". Routledge. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  25. ^ "The Politics of Pictures: The Creation of the Public in the Age of Popular Media". Routledge. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f "Professor John Hartley". ARC Cultural Research Network. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  27. ^ "Creative Industries". John Wiley & Son. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  28. ^ "TV50". Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  29. ^ "Television Truths: Forms of Knowledge in Popular Culture". John Wiley & Son. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  30. ^ "The Uses of Digital Literacy". The University of Queensland Press. Retrieved 21 December 2014. 
  31. ^ "Story Circle: Digital Storytelling Around the World". John Wiley & Son. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  32. ^ "Communication, Cultural and Media Studies: The Key Concepts, 4th Edition". Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  33. ^ "Digital Futures for Cultural and Media Studies". John Riley & Sons. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  34. ^ "Orality and Literacy, 30th Anniversary edition". Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. Retrieved 30 December 2014. 
  35. ^ "Key Concepts in Creative Industries". Sage Publications. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  36. ^ "A Companion to New Media Dynamics". John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  37. ^ "Cultural Science: A Natural History of Stories, Demes, Knowledge and Innovation". Bloomsbury Publishing. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  38. ^ "HARTLEY, John: Centenary Medal". It's an Honour website. Australian Government. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  39. ^ "HARTLEY, John: Member of the Order of Australia". It's an Honour website. Australian Government. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  40. ^ "John Hartley awarded Member of the Order of Australia". ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation. Retrieved 21 December 2014.