Journal des sçavans

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The first issue of the Journal des sçavans (title page)

The Journal des sçavans (later renamed Journal des savants), established by Denis de Sallo, was the earliest academic journal published in Europe. Its content included obituaries of famous men, church history, and legal reports.[1] The first issue appeared as a twelve page quarto pamphlet[2] on Monday, 5 January 1665.[3] This was shortly before the first appearance of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, on 6 March 1665.[4]

The journal ceased publication in 1792, during the French Revolution, and, although it very briefly reappeared in 1797 under the updated title Journal des savants, it did not re-commence regular publication until 1816. From then on, the Journal des savants became more of a literary journal, and ceased to carry significant scientific material.[1][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Amsterdam printing of the Journal des sçavans, Dibner Library of the Smithsonian Institution
  2. ^ Brown, 1972, p. 368
  3. ^ Hallam, 1842, p. 406.
  4. ^ Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Vol.1, Issue 1, is dated March 6, 1665. See also History of the Journal at http://publishing.royalsociety.org/index.cfm?page=1244
  5. ^ James, 2004, xv.

Further reading[edit]

  • Brown, Harcourt (1972). "History and the Learned Journal". Journal of the History of Ideas, 33(3), 365-378.
  • Hallam, Henry (1842). Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries. Harper & Brothers.
  • James, Ioan (2004). Remarkable Physicists: From Galileo to Yukawa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-01706-8
  • Kilgour, Frederick G. (1998). The Evolution of the Book. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-511859-6

External links[edit]