Jules Coleman

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Jules Leslie Coleman (born 1947) is a scholar of law and jurisprudence. He was the Wesley Newcomb Hohfeld Professor of Jurisprudence and Professor of Philosophy at Yale Law School until 2012.[1] Now retired, he most recently served the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Planning at New York University.

Biography[edit]

Coleman received his B.A. from Brooklyn College of CUNY in 1968, his Ph.D in Philosophy from Rockefeller University in 1972, and his M.S.L. from the Yale Law School in 1976. He teaches classes at Yale on philosophy of law; torts; law, language and truth; political philosophy; and rational choice.[1] Coleman briefly served on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley and returned there again later in his career to teach philosophy in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program.[2] In 1988, he received the Brooklyn College Distinguished Alumni Award and was granted a Guggenheim Fellowship. He was selected to deliver the Clarendon Lectures at the University of Oxford.

Coleman is also known for his audiophilia and has published occasionally on the subject of music and sound systems.

Coleman's brother is the fiction writer Reed Farrel Coleman.[3]

Works[edit]

Jules Coleman has published extensively in legal journals and is the author of several books. His works include:

Coleman is best known for his espousal of legal positivism.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Yale Law School | Jules L. Coleman". Law.yale.edu. Retrieved 2012-01-01. [dead link]
  2. ^ Steven R. Rochlin. "On The Road (In San Francisco) Article By Jules Coleman". Enjoythemusic.com. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  3. ^ "Reed Farrel Coleman - Reed Farrel Coleman". Reedcoleman.com. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  4. ^ "The Desk of Jules Coleman". Islandia.law.yale.edu. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 

External links[edit]