Kelp goose

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Kelp goose
Kelpgoosealpha.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Anseriformes
Family: Anatidae
Subfamily: Tadorninae
Genus: Chloephaga
Species: C. hybrida
Binomial name
Chloephaga hybrida
(Molina, 1782)
Subspecies
  • C. h. hybrida (Molina, 1782)
  • C. h. malvinarum (Phillips, 1916)

The kelp goose (Spanish: Caranca or Cauquén Marino), Chloephaga hybrida, is a member of the duck, goose and swan family Anatidae. It is in the shelduck subfamily Tadorninae. It can be found in the Southern part of South America; in Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego, and the Falkland Islands.

Habitat[edit]

Kelp geese inhabit areas of southern Chile and Argentina, mainly in Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego, and the Falkland Islands. They habitat rocky coasts around their food sources.

Description[edit]

Female on left, male on right

Males are a white color, with a black beak, and yellow feet. The females are dark brown, with transverse gray lines on the chest, and yellow feet.[2][3]

Behavior[edit]

Kelp geese generally have clutches of 2-7 eggs. They prefer to hide their eggs in long grass. The eggs hatch about a month later.

There are about 15,000 breeding pairs in existence.[3]

Ecology[edit]

Kelp geese are noted for only eating kelp and will migrate along the coast of South America in order to find kelp, hence the name 'kelp geese'.

Trivia[edit]

In the Falkland Islands and Argentina there are kelp geese stamps.

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Chloephaga hybrida". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ "Birds of the Falkland Islands: Kelp Goose". Retrieved 2007-05-09. 
  3. ^ a b "Kelp Goose". Archived from the original on 2007-05-03. Retrieved 2007-05-09. 

External links[edit]