Legal Aid Society

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The Legal Aid Society in New York City
Legal-aid sm.png
Founded 1876
Type Non-profit
Location
Services Legal representation, class action litigation
Fields Legal services to the indigent
Key people
Charles K. Lexow, Steve Banks
Website http://www.legal-aid.org

The Legal Aid Society in New York City is the United States' oldest and largest provider of legal services to the indigent. It operates both traditional civil and criminal law cases.

History[edit]

Founded in 1876, to defend the individual rights of German immigrants who could not afford to hire a lawyer, the Society now provides a full range of civil legal services, as well as criminal defense work, and juvenile representation in Family Court. The Society's core service is to provide free legal assistance to New Yorkers who live at or below the poverty level and cannot afford to hire a lawyer when confronted with a legal problem.[1]

The Society handles more than 200,000 indigent criminal cases every year, serves as attorneys to more than 30,000 children and represents families, individuals and community groups in more than 30,000 cases. Legal Aid also conducts major class action litigation on behalf of thousands of welfare recipients, foster children, homeless families, elderly poor, inmates at Rikers Island and prisoners.

In New York City, the group acts as an agency for contract attorneys for criminal defendants.

Presidents[edit]

Attorney-in-chief[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The History of the Legal Aid Society". Legal Aid Society. Retrieved 2011-10-31. "The Legal Aid Society was founded in 1876 to defend the individual rights of German immigrants who could not afford to hire a lawyer. The massive influx of poor immigrants into New York City in the years following the Civil War bred resentment and immigrants often became the targets of graft and hostility. ... The first office was at 39 Nassau Street, staffed by attorney Charles K. Lexow. Lexow, a graduate of Columbia Law School ..." 
  2. ^ "Arthur Von Briesen Dies In Ferry House. Lawyer and Philanthropist Stricken with Heart Dissase on Way to Staten Island Home. Ex-Head Legal Aid Society. His Pro-German Sympathies Led to His Resignation During War After 25 Years' Services". New York Times. May 14, 1920. Retrieved 2013-12-01. "Arthur von Briesen, one of the most prominenty American citizens of German birth, who was long active in local and national affairs as a lawyer and philanthropist, died suddenly yesterday of" 
  3. ^ "C. K. Lexow Dies of Heart Attack. Commissioner of Supreme Court Records Was Found Stricken in His Office Thursday. Oldest Republican District Leader in New York City. Brother of Late Clarence Lexow. A Native of New York City. Entered Politics in 1881". New York Times. July 14, 1928. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  4. ^ "Cornelius P. Kitchell, Englewood Leader". New York Times. January 4, 1947. Retrieved 2011-10-24. "Cornelius P. Kitchel, former Mayor of this city and former chief of the Legal Aid Society in New York, died at his home, in Englewood. ..." 
  5. ^ John MacArthur Maguire (1926). The lance of justice: a semi-centennial history of the Legal Aid Society. p. 195. ISBN 0-8377-0847-8. "The sixth Attorney-in-Chief was Cornelius P. Kitchel. His administration, running from early 1905 until nearly the end of 1906, showed steady progress in ..." 
  6. ^ "Banks To Leave The Legal Aid Society After 33 Years To Head HRA In New City Administration". The Legal Aid Society of New York. Retrieved 30 June 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

Holland, Rupert Sargent (June 1907). "Defending the Rights of the Poor". The World's Work: A History of Our Time XIV: 9091–9042. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 

External links[edit]